Posts Tagged ‘pig feeders’

by Dr Mike Brumm | thepigsite.com

With high feed ingredient prices affecting pork producers around the world, it seems logical to expect that closer attention would be paid to management of feeders in swine facilities. However, the experience of every consultant and industry advisor whom the author knows suggests that producers, employees and contract growers continue to be lax in the daily adjustment of feeders.

One of the challenges in feeder adjustment is the many variations in feeder design, especially at the point of feed access by the pig. In some hog feeders, pigs turn wheels or activate agitation devices to make feed available for consumption. In others, feed delivery is controlled by means of a slotted device whose width is controlled by the producer. Add to this the differences in feed flow-ability between mash and pellets, between high- and low-fibre diets, between high- and low-fat inclusion levels and you have the recipe for much variation in the expectation for proper feeder setting to minimise wastage while maximising intake and gain.

In the United States, where a majority of all diets are corn- and soybean meal-based, there are several visual guides available for feeder adjustment. The most commonly used source is a set of pictures from Kansas State University swine specialists.

Equipment manufacturers and nutrition suppliers also offer pictorial guides to assist in feeder adjust.

While these pictures can be very helpful, employees and contract growers often do not relate these pictures to their facilities. There are production facilities where these pictures are posted on the office wall as a guide for employees and the employees ignore the pictures.

In the author’s experience, the best method to have cooperation of all parties in achieving consistent feeder adjustment is to use a digital camera. As the owner and employee or as the advisor and owner/employee walk pens in a facility examining pigs and feeder and drinker adjustments, when they agree on the appropriate feeder adjustment setting, take a picture of the feeder. Print the picture and post it in the office or hallway to the facility (pictures 1 and 2). Now the employee has ‘ownership’ in feeder adjustment because the picture of a correctly adjusted feeder is one that he/she participated in.

Pig feeder adjustment will help minimize waste while maximizing intake and gain. Pictures courtesy of Farmweld Inc.

In general, the research data suggests that feeders designed for ad libitum feed access with diets in the mash form should have approximately 40 per cent of the feeder pan covered with feed. If pan coverage is less than 20 per cent, feed intake may be limited, which will result in a decrease in daily gain and often only a minimal improvement in feed conversion efficiency.

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Visit http://www.barnworld.com for more information on plastic hog feeders, steel hog feeders, outdoor hog feeders, and almost any kind of hog feeders you need!

raisingpigs.blogspot.com

Part of raising pigs the right way is to feed them properly. Pigs eat a lot and quickly. Pigs need a high energy diet that is low in fiber and contains some protein. They eat a lot of food though- the phrase hungry as a pig comes from the fact that a pig will eat just about anything. However, some foods are better than others and if you want to raise a fat and healthy pig, it will be important to give them the right balance of food.

Farm grains are the most common and best source of food to feed pigs. Corn is typically used to feed pigs because it is high in digestible carbohydrates, low in fiber, and tasty! However, corn needs to be supplemented with other vitamins in food in order to keep pigs healthy.

You need to include sources of protein and antibacterial compounds to their feed to slow the growth of harmful bacteria that occurs naturally. In small does, these compounds increase the growth rate of pigs and help lower feeding costs. If you use an antibacterial compound, you must pay attention to the withdrawal rate of the compound. This is the period of time that medicated feeds must be removed from a hog’s diet before you can slaughter them.

Pigs weighing 40 to 125 pounds are referred to as growing pigs. From 125 pounds to market weight (about 230 pounds) pigs are called finishing pigs. As a pig grows, the total amount of dietary protein it needs each day also increases; pigs should be switched from the grower (nutrient dense/more protein) to the finisher (less dense) diet when they weigh about 125 pounds.

Pigs should be self-fed via a trough and this allows them to grow as quickly as possible. Pigs will continue to eat and eat until they are full and its important to let them eat as much as they want. Feeding them yourself might lead to undernourishment as you might think “ohh they have had enough.” But they will know when that have had enough. Let your pigs self eat by creating a deep and big trough for them to eat from. You can also use gravity feed pig feeders and ration style hog feeders that minimize wasted feed.

6 Bushel Oscillating Grower Feeder. To see our complete line of hog feeders, visit us at barnworld.com.

Water is the most important part of a pig’s diet. One-half to two-thirds of a pig’s body is water weight. Pigs must be given all the water they can drink. Water is as important to pigs as it is to people.

Using this information, you’ll be able to feed your pigs the right food and create healthy pigs that will ensure they grow large and fat so when it comes time to slaughter them, their meat will be the best it could have been. Just a like a proper diet is important to plants and people, so it is important to pigs. Make sure to feed them the right food.

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For more information about cattle guards, cattle scales, and saddle pads, please visit our Barn World informational site.

For more information about hog feeders, grain weight conversion, and hay feeders, please visit our Barn World informational site.

For more information about livestock scales, bulk feed bins, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit our Barn World informational site.

by Dr. Elizabeth Magowan | pigprogress.net

There are many commercial feeder types available for pig producers to choose from and in this study, five commercially available feeder types are evaluated on post weaned pigs. The feeder types were: 1) Dry multi space (offered dry feed from four separated compartments beside each other); 2) Wet and dry multi space (offered dry feed and water from three separate compartments beside each other); 3) Maximat (offered a wet feed from a rectangular communal trough); 4) Lean machine (offered a wet feed from a circular communal trough), and 5) Wet and dry single space feeder (offered dry feed and water from a single compartment). In total 800 pigs, housed in 20 pigs per pen were used.

The highest feed intakes and growth rates were attained when pigs were offered feed from the multi space feeders (Table 1). However, pigs offered feed from a dry multi space feeder were more efficient in terms of feed conversion than those offered feed from a wet and dry multi space feeder. The multi space feeder design mimics that of the sucking formation in that it enables pigs to feed together. It appears that the water offered in the wet and dry multi space feed may have caused the feed to become unpalatable. When the total cost of feed consumed per pig from 4-10 weeks of age was calculated a difference of 43p/pig was observed between the dry multi space feeder and the wet and dry multi space feeder. This equates to ₤1,850 on a 200-sow unit where 22 pigs are produced per year per sow. It is concluded that the optimum feeder type for post weaned pigs is the dry multi space feeder.

Does a change in feeder type slow growth?

When pigs are transferred to finishing accommodation on many farms, they experience an abrupt change in feeder type, for example at ARINI feeders change from a Dry multi space feeder to a wet and dry single space feeder. However, a growth check in performance is commonly observed between 10 and 11 weeks of age i.e. in the week directly after pigs are transferred. It is known that changes in the environment of pigs can result in a growth check, mainly as a result of reduced feed intake.

Changes in feeder type at this stage may exacerbate this growth check. It was hypothesized that if the feed type remained constant throughout the life of the pig, feed intake and growth rate could be optimized. Two feeder types were evaluated: a dry multi space feeder (M), and a wet and dry single space feeder (S); over four treatments of feeder sequences (1- S-S; 2- M-M; 3- S-M; 4- M-S). Therefore feeder type changed in two treatments and did not change in the other two treatments. In total 640 pigs housed in 20 pigs per pen were used. The results are shown in Table 2.

Although a greater decrease in feed intake and growth rate was observed in pigs which changed feeder type when they moved accommodation, overall from wean to finish pigs which changed from a dry multi space feeder in stake 1/stage 2 accommodation to a wet and dry single space feeder in finishing accommodation had the highest growth rate. As a result of the high growth rate, the pigs which changed feeder type from a dry multi space feeder to a wet and dry single space feeder had the lowest total feed cost from wean to 100kg live weight. On a 200 sow unit, producing 22 pigs/sow/year, the total feed cost difference between employing the feeder regime of a dry multi space feeder to a wet and dry single space feeder instead of a wet and dry single space feeder throughout the entire life of the pig equated to ₤2,550 per herd per year.

Summary

The optimum feeder regime from wean to finish involves using a dry multi space feeder in the space 1/stage 2 accommodation and a wet and dry single space feeder in the finishing accommodation. Major savings can be made using the correct feeder type and regime. Work is currently ongoing at ARINI investigating the use of commercially available ‘transition’ and ‘Jetmix’ feeders, which offer fixed amounts of feed in the form of a wet gruel from a communal trough in the stage 1/stage 2 accommodation.

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To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

nationalhogfarmer.com

Managing young pigs in large group auto-sort (LGAS) systems poses challenges to pigs’ eating behavior. By ensuring that pigs have adequate room to access hog feeders and managing how they are introduced to the system, pigs can maintain feed intake and readily adjust to this housing system.

Pig behavior was studied in two LGAS systems to determine what adaptations were made at the Prairie Swine Centre Elstow Research Farm and in a commercial grow-finish operation. The Elstow facility housed approximately 250 pigs, with one feeder space per nine pigs. The commercial farm maintained groups of 650 pigs with 60 feeder spaces — a slightly higher feeder-space-to-pig ratio.

Big wheel hog feeder, available at barnworld.com.

At the Elstow research facility, the daily pattern of scale use, the use of individual feeder spaces within the food court, and the eating pattern of individual pigs were studied. Movements through the scale (hits) were studied using automated output from the auto-sort scale. All of the feeder spaces were photographed at five-minute intervals using a time-lapse camera. Ten pigs in each study group were paint-marked.

The study at the commercial farm also used output from the auto-sort scale, and supplemented this with live observations of four rooms of pigs for a 24-hour period. Pigs normally have a daily eating pattern with most of the eating taking place during the day.

Analyses of the photos of the feeder spaces showed a clear diurnal (daily) pattern, with an eight-fold increase in eating behavior during the daytime, compared to the low activity pattern at midnight.

Pigs in small groups typically have 10-15 well-defined “meals” in a day. Pigs in the LGAS had approximately five meals per day, but they were longer in duration than pigs in small group pens. There were no significant differences between average daily gain in LGAS systems compared to conventional small group housing. Comparable performance indicates that pigs can successfully adapt to the LGAS system.

The study at the commercial farm examined the change in eating behavior as pigs aged. Pigs studied in rooms varied six weeks in age. It was found that the average number of entrances into the food court each day decreased as the size (age) of the pigs increased, from nearly four entries per day at 88 lb., to about 2.5 visits per day at 198 lb.

The results show the diurnal pattern of eating by pigs, and shows that younger pigs had less of a dropoff in midday eating. These studies, compared to others, suggest that the younger pigs were limited in the number of feeder spaces and had to shift eating patterns from the normal peak periods to the less-intensive midday period.

Overall, pigs in large group auto-sort systems enter the food court 2-4 times each day and have fewer meals (5 vs. 10-15) than their small-pen counterparts. They compensate by increasing the length of their eating periods and move freely about the food court, eating from several pig feeders every day.

To ease the transition to large group systems, pigs should be introduced directly to the food court to make sure they know where the feed is located. The food court should be spacious so that pigs have access to all of the feeders; a feeder space should be provided for every 10-12 pigs.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

nationalhogfarmer.com

Poor hog feeder adjustment slashes feed efficiency by 5%, while properly adjusted feeders save about $2/pig from 50 to 270 lb., according to a recent study at Kansas State University. Keep feeders adjusted properly, regardless of trough space, to maintain good feed efficiency.

The 91-day study evaluated the effects of feeder trough space (1.75 vs. 3.5 in./pig) and minimum feeder-gap opening of 0.5 in. (narrow) vs. 1.0 in. (wide) on finishing pig performance. A total of 288 pigs went on test at 82 lb. in one of four treatments at the K-State Swine Teaching and Research Center, Manhattan, KS.

The hog feeders were adjusted to the minimum gap setting, but the agitation plate could be moved upward to a maximum gap setting of 0.75 in. or 1.25 in. Narrow feeder gap was 0.5 in. minimum to 0.75 in. maximum. Wide feeder gap was 1.0 in. minimum to 1.25 in. maximum.

Feeder trough space was adjusted by placing eight or 16 pigs/pen. For the 3.5 in. of feeder space/pig, pens were stocked with eight pigs/pen. To achieve the 1.75 in. of feeder space/pig, two pens were combined with only one feeder for the 16 pigs. Gating was adjusted so that both of the groups of eight or 16 pigs/pen got 8 sq. ft. of space/pig.

Pigs were given ad-lb access to feed and water and fed a four-phase, corn-soybean meal-based diet containing 20% distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS), as depicted in Table 1.

Pig performance on feed was calculated by weighing pigs and measuring feed disappearance on Day 0, 14, 28, 42, 56, 70, 84 and 91. Pictures of feeder pan coverage were taken once during each feeding phase, and a panel of four judges scored the feeder pan pictures by the percentage of pan coverage.

Evaluations of feeder pan coverage indicated narrow-adjusted pig feeders averaged approximately 48% coverage (Figure 1), while wide-adjusted feeders averaged approximately 85% coverage (Figure 2).

From Day 0 to 56, no feeder adjustment/trough space interactions were observed. However, those pigs exposed to the wide feeder gap setting had increased average daily feed intake (ADFI), which resulted in a tendency for poorer feed conversion, suggesting that the increase in feed intake with the wider feeder gap setting, actually produced an increase in feed wastage (Table 2).

From Day 56 to 91, there was a tendency for pigs with 3.5 in. feeder space to have greater average daily gain, compared to pigs with the 1.75 in. feeder space. Also, pigs tested on the wide feeder gap setting had increased ADFI and poorer feed efficiency, similar to the response observed during Day 0 to 56 (Table 2).

Overall, these results suggest that, regardless of feeder trough space, pigs fed with the wide feeder adjustment wasted more feed and grew less efficiently.

Further evidence is needed to determine optimal feeder trough space for finishing pigs.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

cattlenetwork.com

Corn
Trends
Short Term: Down
Net Long Futures and Options: 154796
Long Term: Down
Change: -6000
Overnight Trade: U -10 3/4 Z -12 3/4
Opening Calls: Higher

The corn numbers weren’t as negative as feared. Ending stocks estimates for both the old crop and new crop were higher than last month at 880 and 870 million respectively, which was expected, but not as high as the average trade guesses. New crop ending stocks are still below 1 billion, which is a psychological boost, and will return the focus of the market to the weather, which at the moment is turning more bullish.


Wheat
Trends
Short Term: Down

Net Long Futures and Options: -51255
Long Term: Down
Change: -3000
Overnight Trade: Chicago: U -12 3/4 KC: U -10 1/4
Opening Calls: Higher

The wheat numbers ended up being friendly with the new crop ending stocks estimate actually falling below last month at 670 million. Surprisingly, to me at least, was that this was not because of lower production. Production was actually increased, but the demand figures were increased enough, particularly exports, to offset the higher production. This should allow for a decent short covering rally in the wheat.


Soybeans
Trends
Short Term: Up Net Long Futures and Options: 33449
Long Term: Down Change: +1000
Overnight Trade: U -11 X-11 1/4
Opening Calls: Mixed

The soybean figures were slightly negative with the old crop ending stocks at 200 million and new crop at 175. Since the numbers were really close to expectations I think that the weather will be a lot more important that the report today and the rest of the week. The heat moving into the corn belt should be supportive to the market.

Live Cattle
Trend
Short Term: Up
Long Term: Up
Opening Calls: 10-30 Lower

Live cattle futures closed steady to moderately higher on Monday, as traders ignored slumping world economic concerns to rally from sharply lower opening trade. Limit higher move in the August lean hog contract provided support. Hogs are higher on rumors of large exports into China. Less competing meat into the fourth quarter should provide excellent support for the fat cattle market. Overnight markets have trimmed back most of Monday’s gains. equities continue to struggle.

Feeder Cattle
Trends
Short Term: Up
Long Term: Up
Opening Call: 30-50 Lower

Feeder cattle futures posted moderate to stout gains on Monday, supported by lower corn and higher fats. Cash feeders continue to support, at near record high levels. This mornings’ grain supply/demand report could change opening calls for the feeders. Expectations for a low June placement number will add support.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

nationalhogfarmer.com
06/27/2011

Summer months can trigger heat stress in livestock, especially in pigs, according to Mark Whitney, a swine specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension. Pigs are especially challenged because they lack functional sweat glands to help them efficiently reduce body heat.

Even though the majority of pigs today are raised in modern confinement facilities that provide some climate control, producers still face limits in their ability to cool pigs during extreme heat, he says.

Pigs naturally remove body heat during periods of heat stress through a combination of accelerated respiration, decreased feed intake, increased water consumption and adjustments in physical activity and movement.

Pork producers can minimize heat stress for their pigs by:

  1. Preparing and maintaining cooling systems. Check cooling systems and ensure that thermostats, fans, air inlets, drip coolers, sprinklers, cooling cells and other related equipment are set for summer usage. Use of sprinklers, along with fans, can reduce the temperature in barns provided sprinklers are set correctly. Avoid sprinklers that provide a very fine mist because they will increase humidity levels in the barn. Cooling cells work more effectively to lower humidity levels. Adjust ventilation systems to remove excess moisture from buildings.
  2. Adjusting the feeding program. Since pigs will lower their feed intake during periods of high temperatures, increase the nutritional density of the diet for growing pigs and lactating sows. Adding fat to the hog feeder will also increase the caloric density, but if other nutrient levels are not also increased accordingly, animal performance will still suffer, Whitney says.
  3. Modifying procedures during load-out and transportation of pigs. Transportation is perhaps the most stressful time for pigs during periods of heat. Remove feed from pigs for 12-18 hours before shipment (remove feed but not water). Load fewer pigs in order to allow maximum air movement. Keep vehicles in constant motion and open all vents and slats. Avoid moving pigs during the heat of the day, and allow more time to load pigs. Pigs are apt to become fatigued during hot weather. Additional time and patience are needed to effectively load pigs, while reducing pig and handler stress.

For more educational information, visit extension.umn.edu

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

gallagher.com.au

With large, easy-to-press buttons, back-lit screens for shed use and the ability to record up to 60,000 animal weights, the latest innovations in weigh-scale technology give farmers and consultants more options than ever before.

Increased farm profitability and user ease are the drivers behind Gallagher’s new generation of weigh-scale technology.

The animal-management system expert has launched a brand new model in the range — the W610. This will be particularly useful in the sheep industry, which is increasingly realising the productivity benefits of electronic tag identification (EID).

The Gallagher-branded range also includes upgraded models of the entry-level weigh scale W210 and W310, plus new W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector, as well as the revolutionary SmartTSi complete livestock management system.

Mike Hemsley, product manager for Gallagher Animal Management Systems, says the new-generation models have resulted from Gallagher’s continual-improvement process.

“We know from research, and simply from what we have out working in paddocks across Australia, that our products are good. Our aim is to make those good products even better in design and usability.”

Flexible W610 has massive memory

Mr Hemsley says the new W610 model is the best entry-level EID weighing system available.

“The W610 can connect to any brand of EID reader and has a massive memory that can store weight readings from 12,000 animals. Additional livestock-management information, such as average daily weight gain and carcase weight, can be calculated and displayed automatically on the two large LCD screens when the animal is weighed.”

The W610 also enables five-way drafting by weight, and includes a full keyboard for manually logging visual IDs.

Back-lit screen, tougher construction

The upgraded W210 and W310, plus new W610 and W810 models, have a tougher construction, larger back-lit screens, raised keyboards and ergonomically operated switches and buttons. Being back-lit, the screens are easy to read in low-light conditions, such as inside a shed.

Mr Hemsley says the W210 has a “clamshell farm-ready toughness”, large buttons for easy selection and a big rotary dial, all of which make it simple to use. It has auto-weight locking or manual-weighing modes and a rechargeable battery.

A step up from the W210, the W310 can sort two ways, and, like the W610 and W810, it shows weighing statistics on screen.

The W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector has even easier data collection than the Ruddweigh 800, which it replaces. On top of the benefits of the W610, it also has internal bluetooth for easier connectivity to electronic readers. The W810 also records the date of every weight measurement and allows the user to enter and edit notes on each recording entry, and can store 21,000 animal IDs and 60,000 weight recordings. It can be set to draft up to nine ways: by EID, list and/or by weight.

SmartTSi

The SmartTSi is Gallagher’s premier animal-management system. Advanced, yet simple-to-use, SmartTSi combines a computer, weigh scale and animal-performance software.

Its intuitive touch-screen ensures that recording and accessing individual animal or herd information is simple and fast, saving farmers time when weighing animals.

Mike Hemsley says SmartTSi models to be released early this year will feature a software upgrade that will also be available to existing SmartTSi users.

“The software upgrade for existing SmartTSi users will be absolutely free. We like users of our technology to have the best tools in their hands.”

Unique full range

Mr Hemsley said the addition of the W610 model to the new-generation range of weigh scales means Gallagher can meet any customer’s needs. All products are backed by a market-leading on-farm sales and support service team.

The range, which was launched on 1 February, sees Gallagher as the only company with a full range of permanent and portable EID readers, software, loadbars, weigh scales and tags.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

The Readers of National Hog Farmer are again looking forward to the “2011 New Product Tour” Issues. Now is your chance to put focus on products/services introduced to the industry in the past year.

Over 20,000 engaged pork producers will learn more about the features and benefits that make your new product valuable.

2010 World Pork Expo New Product Showcase
Shines Spotlight on Most Promising New Products
Pork industry innovators have been busy coming up with a variety of new products to help producers save money and improve efficiency this year. National Hog Farmer is pleased to offer our readers and World Pork Expo attendees an opportunity to learn more about new products and services recently introduced to the pork industry.

A panel of pork industry experts will be taking a close look at the new products on behalf of our pork producer readers. And you can join the review process too. Come visit the National Hog Farmerbooth #623 in the Varied Industries Building at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines during World Pork Expo and cast your vote for the most promising new product. When you cast your vote, you are automatically entered in a daily prize drawing.

New Product Tour Nominees

In the meantime, go ahead and get a head start on the new product tour by taking a look at the new product nominations featured below. National Hog Farmer’s New Product Review Panel will share their thoughts in a special feature in the July 15 issue. And the votes cast by World Pork Expo attendees will select the “producer’s choice” new product.

SmartIR Feed Sensor
AP’s SmartIR Feed System Sensor controls all functions of a feed delivery system by using six infrared beams to detect the presence of feed. The system is not affected by changes in temperature, humidity or feed type and does not require any sensitivity adjustments. An alarm can provide notification if an out-of-feed event is occurring. The large digital display and system status LEDs are designed for easy reading. SmartIR can be adapted to nearly all new or existing feed systems.

Learn more at
www.automatedproduction.com
Call 217-226-4449 or
email apsales@automatedproduction.com.
Visit Booth No. 179 VIB


Sepcom Manure Solids Separator
Agpro introduces the Sepcom screw press-type manure solids separator to the U.S. market. The separator features a steel-reinforced polymer screw and a quick-replace, wedge wire screen. A patented outlet orifice plate requires no weights or cylinders. The use of a polymer screw against a stainless steel screen significantly extends component life and lowers maintenance challenges. Varying pitch screw and screen openings helps contribute to the ultimate in solids removal. The Sepcom Manure Solids Separator has been in use for over three years in Europe.

Learn more at
www.agprousa.com
Call 800-527-1030 or
email agpro@neto.com
Visit Booth No. 676 VIB


New Pig Plus Combination Tag
Allflex has developed an identification tag combination to help aid in easy identification as the pig grows. The new Piglet tag male is combined with the softer, more pliable Pig+ female, which is placed on the inner side of the ear. The Pig+ female panel tag allows for deep or higher application on the small ear and allows for free rotation of the two tags. The all-plastic Piglet male tag is placed on the outside of the ear and can stand up in the environment. Both pieces can be custom laser-marked at an economical price.

Learn more at
www.allflexusa.com
Call 515-708-6804 or
email pflint@allflexusa.com
Visit Booth No. 366 VIB


Sure Drop
The Sure Drop from Improved Solutions, Inc. is a new device designed to work with existing release devices on the market to open sidewall curtains to help protect pigs during overheating and power-failure events. A unique design allows the lock handle to drop, eliminating the need for a hand winch to unwind. The Sure-Drop includes a mounting panel with two fixed pulleys, the cable release device, and the moveable pulley pre-mounted on the panel. The panel is configured to work as either a left- or right-hand device.

Call 618-895-1318 or
email suredrop1@gmail.com
Visit Booth No. 607 VIB


First Step™ Feed
First Step Creep Feed helps create “eaters” prior to weaning. Designed for baby pigs from 14-25 days of age, First Step uses a unique form, proprietary palatants and specialty ingredients in order to optimize feed intake while supporting the developing immune and digestive systems. Research shows creating eaters pre-weaning helps optimize post-weaning gain.

Learn more at
www.UltraCareFeed.com
Visit Booth No. 356 – 360 VIB


Swinewater Manure Treatment System
Livestock Water Recycling has developed a pre-manufactured Manure Treatment System designed to be placed directly at the swine production site. Installation of the system eliminates the need for a manure storage lagoon. The end products of the Manure Treatment System include clean, re-usable water, dry solids and concentrated, nutrient-rich fertilizer.

Learn more at
www.livestockwaterrecycling.com
Call 403-203-4972 or
email karen.schuett@livestockwaterrecycling.com
Visit Booth No. CB 2902 at World Pork Expo Outdoor


Mi-T-M CWC-3005 Pressure Washer
The Mi-T-M CWC cold water pressure washer offers an abundance of pressure in a compact, user-friendly unit. A new, narrow roll-cage frame design will fit through any 30-in. door and provides a center eye lifting hook. This belt-drive unit features a heavy duty, low rpm, 5-gpm pump and industrial TEFC 10-hp. motor, producing 3000 psi of cleaning power. The unit rolls easily on four wheels.

Learn more at
www.washersystems.com
Call 800-433-8441 or
email wsoiegli@mchsi.com
Visit Booth No. 4012 OA


Swine Management Tool Series (SMTS)
The Swine Management Tool Series (SMTS) is a suite of software comprised of ten, fully integrated modules. The software offers farm-to-fork information traceability, wireless remote data capture solutions and superior web-designed reporting. From wean to harvest, every segment of information related to the swine live-production cycle, including technical field service data and group accounting data, can be tracked and analyzed. Planning modules allow users to forecast future market fluctuations and plan for production changes.

Learn more at
www.Mtech-Systems.com
Call 678-990-2345 or
email sales@mtech-systems.com
Visit Booth No. 553 VIB


ParaSail®
Newport Laboratories offers ParaSail®, the swine industry’s first avirulent live, single-dose vaccine for Haemophilus parasuis. Available exclusively through veterinarians, ParaSail has been proven to protect against three of the most predominant strains of H. parasuis currently circulating including serotype 4, serotype 5, and serotype 13. The USDA has approved ParaSail for use as a single-dose product with a 1- ml. intramuscular dose size for pigs aged 21 days or older.

Learn more at
www.parasailprotection.com
Call 800-220-2522 ext. 3030 or
email info@parasailprotection.com
Visit Booth No. 152 VIB


NORSVIN® LY – The Full Program
Norsvin USA introduces the NORSVIN® LY Full Program F1 breeding gilt. This parent female combines traits of the NORSVIN® Landrace with NORSVIN® Yorkshire resulting in the first NORSVIN® LYfemales for U.S. producers. Norsvin genetics provide superior productivity in both total pigs born and total weaned while achieving excellent weaning weights. Norsvin breeding stock balances outstanding structure and underlines with feed efficiency, growth and carcass quality, contributing to top market hog performance.

Learn more at
www.norsvinusa.com
Call 507-259-7604 or
email dale.hover@norsvinusa.com
Visit Booth No. 628 VIB


MaxKlor
Preserve International’s new stabilized chlorine dioxide product, MaxKlor, is a great step in water treatment for pork producers. MaxKlor is EPA registered to inactivate bacteria, viruses, protozoa and algae in watering systems for animals, and is also approved for drinking water for pigs and humans. It oxidizes minerals like iron and manganese for removal through filtration. Disinfect traditional pathogens like fecal coliform and E. Coli without creating resistance, while also killing newer, more resilient pathogens.

Learn more at
www.preserveinternational.com
Call 800-995-1607 or
email stuartheller@bellsouth.net
Visit Booth No. 506 VIB


Life Savior

SEC Repro, Inc. offers the Life Savior to help prevent piglet crushing in the farrowing crate up to six days after birth. A sensor on the Life Savior unit triggers a blower to send a stream of air between the sow’s legs when she sits, stands or moves. Piglets move out of the danger zone when hit by the air stream. The washable Life Savior can be installed in the piglet “comfort zone” with most farrowing crates.

Learn more at
www.secrepro.com
Call 450-776-0596 or
email louis@secrepro.com
Visit Booth No. 633 VIB


Sector Probe Extension

The Sector Probe Extension from SEC Repro, Inc. helps improve safety while protecting the ultrasound probe during pregnancy checking by allowing sows to be scanned from outside of the gestation crate. A 15-in. hollow, molded plastic pipe allows the Agroscan probe to be inserted inside of the crate. The Sector Probe Extension allows the user the flexibility to pregnancy check sows on either the left or right side.

Learn more at
www.secrepro.com
Call 450-776-0596 or
email louis@secrepro.com
Visit Booth No. 633 VIB


National Swine Nutrition Guide
The 2010 National Swine Nutrition Guide (NSNG) is a practical publication containing 35 nutrition Factsheets with nutrient recommendations and feeding guidelines. The NSNG also comes complete with a booklet containing nutrient recommendation tables from the Factsheets, and a Diet Formulation and Evaluation CD. Producers can use the CD to formulate swine diets on a least-cost basis and to evaluate the nutritional adequacy of existing diets for sows, boars, nursery pigs, growing and finishing pigs, replacement gilts and boars.

Learn more at
www.usporkcenter.org
Call 515-294-7556 or
email drdave@iastate.edu
Visit Booth No. 150 VIB


VivaSound 16/128 Echograph
UNGAVA is introducing the portable VivaSound 16/128 Echograph to the veterinary market. The compact, battery-operated hand-held unit features a 100% digital beamformer to help provide crisp images. Its aluminum and rubber casing makes it extremely durable for daily operation under farm conditions. The unit is designed for easy connection to a personal computer. The product is also ready for real-time in vivo Intramuscular Fat (IMF) readings.

Learn more at
www.ungava-tech.com
Call +1-418-266-1077 or
email info@ungava-tech.com
Visit Booth No. 261 VIB


Ventra PRO Controller
The new and expanded Ventra PRO Controller from VAL-CO™ incorporates a hardware redesign for better field serviceability by including plug-in relays, wire rerouting for reduced electrical interference and allowing easier wiring via plug-in terminals. A software redesign offers expanded capability for tracking propane usage and providing the ability to store multiple programs on an SD card. The Ventra PRO Controller provides one-touch access to pertinent information such as daily high/low temperatures, water usage, feeder run times, etc., all in one simple menu at the touch of a button.

Learn more at
www.valcompanies.com
Call 717-354-4586 ext. 451 or
email sales@valcompanies.com
Visit Booth No. 637 VIB


PICS
PICS is an inventory control tool that helps producers save time and money by minimizing inventory shrink. Producers can receive product into the inventory, check product out to the field, add products to a simple, online ordering site and make adjustments to inventory with reason codes. The PICS has the ability to track product usage by receiving empty containers/bottles back in from the field. A handheld scanner is provided along with bar codes and necessary labels.

Learn more at
www.walcointl.com
Call 817-859-3415 or
email whitem@walcointl.com
Visit Booth No. 522 VIB


Low Stress Pig Handling for Truckers Online Training Course
The online training course, “Low Stress Pig Handling for Truckers” uses real-life video depicting the process of loading and unloading pot-bellied semi trailers as a teaching tool to help truckers learn about practical pig-handling skills. This training is designed to help truckers move stock more easily while maintaining the value of the animals being transported. Poor animal handling can cost pork producers millions of dollars every year through death, trim and meat-quality losses.

Learn more at
www.dnlfarmstraining.com
Call 306-276-5761 or
email dnlfarms@xplornet.com
Visit Booth No. 3018 CB


Key Dollar Separators
Key Dollar separators use two ½ hp. motors, are self-cleaning and use their own water, no fresh water is required. The separators hold up well and can produce water for pigs from the waste water with a little help and treatment. A standard roll press is used for composting or bedding. Five models are available to fit producer needs.

Learn more at
www.keydollar.com
Call 509-386-1220 o
email key_dollar@hotmail.com
Visit Booth No. 4317 OA

NEW PRODUCT NOMINATION FORM

World Pork Expo New Product Tour
Nomination Form

Cost of Entry: $750
Deadline for entries: April 8, 2011

Nominate your new product for the 2011 New Product Tour and take advantage of this special offer to increase your exposure:
• Place an ad on Pork Industry Express at half price – your cost: $150; valued at: $300
• National Hog Farmer TV – Supply a video to National Hog Farmer and we will post it on our Web site for one month, your cost: $200
Call for questions: 952-851-4605 or debbie.weinhold@penton.com

1. Company Name
2. Company Address
3. City
4. State
5. Zip code
6. Company Phone
7. Booth Number
8. Web site address
9. Trade name of product
10. Name and phone number of contact person
12. Email
13. Phone

14. Attach separately…a brief description of the product including why it is important to pork producers. You may include a sales brochure, copy of an ad and photos. Send 6 copies of the entry form, product description, photo and any other material to:

Debbie Weinhold
NATIONAL HOG FARMER
7900 International Drive, Suite 300
Minneapolis, MN 55425
952-851-4605

Or, send your nomination form, product description and hi-res images electronically to: debbie.weinhold@penton.com

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

nationalhogfarmer.com

Dec 30, 2009 12:47 PM

A new Iowa State University (ISU) Extension publication can help farmers track their energy use and compare their usage and costs for various energy sources. “Tracking the Energy Use on Your Farm” is available to download from the Extension Online Store.

The publication includes an energy log that can be downloaded for use with Microsoft Excel or printed and completed by hand, says Jane Flammang, ISU Extension program coordinator for the new statewide Farm Energy Conservation and Efficiency educational initiative. Farmers can use the log to track total on-farm energy use, including electricity, diesel fuel, gasoline, propane or natural gas. The Excel spreadsheet will automatically calculate a farmer’s per-unit cost and the total energy cost month to month throughout the year.

This publication is part of a series of materials designed to increase farmer awareness of methods to improve efficient use of energy and help them explore alternatives to reduce farm energy demand and improve overall profitability.

The ISU effort is made possible by a grant from the Iowa Energy Center.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.