Posts Tagged ‘hog feeders’

by Dr Mike Brumm | thepigsite.com

With high feed ingredient prices affecting pork producers around the world, it seems logical to expect that closer attention would be paid to management of feeders in swine facilities. However, the experience of every consultant and industry advisor whom the author knows suggests that producers, employees and contract growers continue to be lax in the daily adjustment of feeders.

One of the challenges in feeder adjustment is the many variations in feeder design, especially at the point of feed access by the pig. In some hog feeders, pigs turn wheels or activate agitation devices to make feed available for consumption. In others, feed delivery is controlled by means of a slotted device whose width is controlled by the producer. Add to this the differences in feed flow-ability between mash and pellets, between high- and low-fibre diets, between high- and low-fat inclusion levels and you have the recipe for much variation in the expectation for proper feeder setting to minimise wastage while maximising intake and gain.

In the United States, where a majority of all diets are corn- and soybean meal-based, there are several visual guides available for feeder adjustment. The most commonly used source is a set of pictures from Kansas State University swine specialists.

Equipment manufacturers and nutrition suppliers also offer pictorial guides to assist in feeder adjust.

While these pictures can be very helpful, employees and contract growers often do not relate these pictures to their facilities. There are production facilities where these pictures are posted on the office wall as a guide for employees and the employees ignore the pictures.

In the author’s experience, the best method to have cooperation of all parties in achieving consistent feeder adjustment is to use a digital camera. As the owner and employee or as the advisor and owner/employee walk pens in a facility examining pigs and feeder and drinker adjustments, when they agree on the appropriate feeder adjustment setting, take a picture of the feeder. Print the picture and post it in the office or hallway to the facility (pictures 1 and 2). Now the employee has ‘ownership’ in feeder adjustment because the picture of a correctly adjusted feeder is one that he/she participated in.

Pig feeder adjustment will help minimize waste while maximizing intake and gain. Pictures courtesy of Farmweld Inc.

In general, the research data suggests that feeders designed for ad libitum feed access with diets in the mash form should have approximately 40 per cent of the feeder pan covered with feed. If pan coverage is less than 20 per cent, feed intake may be limited, which will result in a decrease in daily gain and often only a minimal improvement in feed conversion efficiency.

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Visit http://www.barnworld.com for more information on plastic hog feeders, steel hog feeders, outdoor hog feeders, and almost any kind of hog feeders you need!

by Karen Alicea | ezinearticles.com

When you receive your feeder pig it should be between 40-75 lbs in weight and around 8 to 10 weeks of age. At this point your pig has been on some sort of solid food for some time. You should also get more than one pig, having only one pig at a time will take longer for your pig to gain weight. Pigs just have the natural instinct to fight for their food if there is only one they have no need to fight for their food therefore they will not try to get the most they can at all times.

In order to get your feeder pig to continue on the path to maximum growth the best thing that I have found for them is first that giving them a ground corn tends to be better for younger pigs than say a whole or cracked corn because it is easier for them to digest, and they get more from the corn rather than it just being expelled immediately. Though this is a bit time consuming it is much better for them and you will see a difference in the overall weight gain. Next I add a soybean meal which is high in protein and will also contribute to the weight gain, protein is one of the main components in getting your pigs to excel in their growth.

Then there is the pig grain, you can use this either with or without medications in it, for the first couple of months I tend to prefer it with it because as you will well know that pigs are very susceptible to stress and having these medications in their food help to keep there immune system up and anything that may help is a plus. I take some of each of these rationed according to the number of pigs that I have making sure that at first at the 8 week level each pig gets about 1 lb of food a day. Feeding my pigs twice a day. I take this mix of the ground corn, soybean meal, and grain mix it together and then I wet it making it into a mush like mix, doing this makes for the pigs digestive system to take longer to digest it and once again adding to overall weight. At about every 2 week increase their food by 1 lb each pig and if you have any local fruit and vegetable markets you can stop and ask for any old food they will let you have it which in some cases will keep feed costs down but it will take longer to put on weight if you cut back on the other feed. You also can get day old breads or even donuts from local bakeries they will sometimes let you have them too but be careful that type of foods will give your pigs diarrhea and can contribute to much fat other wise you will have a very lean pig in about 4 months.

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ehow.com

A newborn pig grows to approximately 250 pounds in five to six months. Typically, a young pig is weaned from the sow at around 8 weeks of age and weighs 40 pounds. Prior to this time, the sow nurses the baby pigs up to 24 times a day. They consume a diet heavy in protein. After the weaning stage, young pigs need a new diet of dry feed. This new diet must consist of minerals, vitamins, energy feed and a protein supplement.

Things You’ll Need

  • Water trough
  • Self-feeder
  • Commercial starter feed

Big Wheel Hog Feeder - 25 to 105 bushel, available at barnworld.com.

Instructions

1. Choose a starter feed that is digestible, economical and palatable for young piglets. Young pigs need to consume a diet of approximately 18 percent protein. Provide a relatively inexpensive protein meal with soybeans, or give whey and skim milk for a higher quality source of protein; however, the latter option costs more than soybeans. Try blood meal, fish meal and peanut meal to add protein to the diet as well.

2. Purchase a starter feed with adequate amounts of minerals and vitamins for a growing pig. Be sure the feed can provide the young pigs with the energy they need to grow. Look for ingredients such as barely, wheat and corn.

3. Look for a starter feed that is either crumbled, pelleted or ground. Smaller feed is easier for younger pigs to digest. Young pigs eat approximately 3 to 5 pounds of food a day.

4. Set up a self-feeder for the younger pigs. A hog feeder keeps the food dry and clean. Provide enough space for all the pigs to access the feeder at once. Feed the young pigs twice a day, if a self-feeder is not available.

5. Provide fresh water to the pigs at all times. Piglets around 8 week of age can begin to use a nipple waterier which keeps the drinking water clean. Clean and replace water in troughs regularly if they are used.

Tips & warnings

  • Talk to local farmers, herders and breeders if you have questions about the proper care of young pigs.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

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by Tammy Bronson | eHow.com

There are two kinds of hog feeders, the gravity kind and the ration kind. Ration feeders require adjustments allowing only a certain amount of food dispensing at one time; gravity feeders fill a trough to a leveling point and then stops dispensing. Both types of feeders regulate the amount of food a hog has available. The goal of adjusting feed is to minimize the waste of feed from spillage and over-feeding. There are categories of hog feeder: nursery, grower and finishing hog feeders. The weight of a hog feeder is substantial making it difficult for the hog to knock the feeder over.

Big wheel hog feeder, available at barnworld.com.

Things You’ll Need

  • Ruler

Instructions

  1. Read the marked settings on the ration feeder. Choose a feed gate that leaves the hog satisfied, but not overly full.
  2. Shift the adjustment lever up to reduce the amount of food dispensed and down to increase the amount.
  3. Measure the amount of food the feeder dispenses. On average the feed gate should dispense 11/48 inches of food.
  4. Check the bolt on the adjustment lever periodically. If the stud welded on to the adjustment lever is broken then the hog feeder is dispensing too much food. It is not uncommon for hogs to play and break the exposed parts of a hog feeder.

Tips & warnings

  • Letting a hog run wild will burn off calories and require greater amounts of food consumption. House slaughtering hogs in a small area preventing running so that bulking up requires less feed.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

essortment.com

Raising pigs on your farm requires time and a large investment. There are several things needed when you begin to raise pigs. It is profitable if you do it the right way. I would suggest to anyone that wants to get started raising pigs start on a small scale basis. Also make sure you have all the needed accessories before you start.

Here is what you will need to get started:

1. A good fence around the location you plan to keep the hogs. The fence doesn’t have to be as tall for a pig as some animals, but it needs to be sturdy, especially at the bottom.

2. Don’t overcrowd your pigs. In confinement it doesn’t take as much space, but outside you need at least 100 sq. ft. per pig.

3. An adequate watering system. Pigs need fresh water available to them all of the time, and lots of it.

4. I also recommend a large hog feeder. It saves a lot of waste and time with the feeding.

6 Bushel Oscillating Grower Feeder - Model S628GF, available at barnworld.com.

5. Also you will need good shelter for the hogs during storms and in the heat.

6. If you plan on keeping sows to raise your own piglets you will also need some type of farrowing house. This will protect your litters from the weather.

Now that you have all of these things you are ready to get your pigs. You need to decide what kind of operation you are going to run. I like to buy feeder pigs that are around 45lbs and then top them out to market weight. I find this way more profitable for myself. You can also raise the pigs yourself to top out or sell as feeders. It takes longer to turn over a profit and plus you have to keep sows and a boar on hand at all times.

The first and foremost thing in raising pigs is proper feed and nutrition. Corn is the number one feed for hogs, but you will need some type of supplement to feed along with it. Your local veterinarian or feed store can assist you with this. Also run a clean operation to keep your hogs disease free. Disease could wipe out your entire operation if not taken care of.

These are the basics of raising pigs for profit. Whether you decide to go large scale or just raise enough to put meat on your families table. It takes a lot of hard work but in the end you will be pleased with what you produce. Have fun and remember it takes no more time to raise ten hogs than it does one. Just start out with what is comfortable for you and your budget.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

agriculture.com

Not every company with a booth or exhibit at the World Pork Expo in Des Moines this week claims that their product can save feed. But, a lot of them do.

Signs in the exhibit aisles scream out to the hog farmers: “Cut feed costs!”; “Get more efficient!”; “Let us help you save on the feed bill!”

These exhibitors aren’t dumb — they know that the first question on every pork producer’s mind these days is how to survive with six-dollar corn.

I wonder, as I wander those aisles, if I put enough of these products to use, could I get so efficient that my pigs would grow on absolutely NO feed, just breathing air? OK, let’s see what we can do.

My first stop is at the A.J. O’Mara Group, LLC. There, John A’Mara explains their line of stainless steel hog feeders, called Feed Ease Equipment. The Cadillac of the lineup is a grow-finish feeder that has a water nipple right in the feed trough. To get a drink, the pigs have to run water onto the feed, which encourages consumption of both. They waste less of the liquid feed, partly because when the pigs step back from the feeder, there’s less dry feed stuck to their mouth that can drop into the manure pit. The result is a 5% to 7% improvement in feed efficiency, says O’Mara. I decide on the spot that when given a range, I’m going to take the high end, in this case, 7% better feed efficiency. Great, one stop and I’ve saved seven percent of my feed bill.

Big "O" oscillating feeder, available at barnworld.com.

Next stop is just across the aisle at the booth of IFA Roller Grinders of tiny Stanley, Iowa. Lee Drewelow of the company says his feed grinder is actually a roller mill, with two rolling drums that turn at different speeds and crush the corn into finer particles than the other kind of grinder, a hammermill. The finer particles (650 microns versus 1,000 for the hammermill) means there is less dust, less feed separation, and more efficient conversion in the pig’s gut. The sign on Drewelow’s booth says it saves 50 pounds of feed per pig finished. “We normally think it takes 10 bushels of corn to finish a pig, but we can reduce that to 9,” he says. By my math, that’s a 10% savings. Add that to the Feed Ease feeder, and our combined savings are now 17% — we’re getting there!

A little farther down the aisle is the display of Genetiporc, a breeding company that sells boars and gilts. Dr. Dan Hamilton, their technical services manager, tells me that they have a new terminal sire line that is bred just for feed efficiency. Combined with their most feed efficienct female line, the offspring will consistently use .15 pounds less feed per pound of gain than other genetics. In other words, if your current feed conversion is 2.75 pounds of feed per pound of gain, you might reduce that to 2.60 with Genetiporc’s G Performer boar, and it’s Fertilis 25 sow. That’s nearly a 6% gain in feed efficiency.

Add it up: We’re saving 23% of our feed now! No time to stop here.

Kevin Curry at Alpharma tells us about their BMD feed additive, active ingredient bacitracin antibiotic. It’s almost never used in humans, so this antibiotic gets less grief from those who worry about bacterial resistance from animal use. It’s typically used from 50 pounds to market weight at a low level to ward off harmful microbes, there’s no withdrawal period, and it will save 30-35 pounds of feed per hog with 3% better feed efficiency. Curry even finds a way to tout the “green” benefits of this product: “There’s less manure to spread.”

At Ralco Nutrition, national sales manager Tom Lattimore tells me about a feed ingredient product called EnMax, which lets them formulate pig feeds on net energy, using more crystalline amino acids and enzymes, less soybean meal (100-150 pounds less per ton), and more corn. Pigs get more energy from the feed, plus some enzymes that “unlock” all of the ingredients. “We can take a conventional feed, and with EnMax, save $30 to $40 per ton,” says Lattimore. “That’s $10 per pig.” Great, but what about improved feed efficiency? “We don’t really have any claims on that,” he says. Nuts, let’s keep moving.

Farther down, Olmix is a French company with a couple of products, one of which is a feed ingredient called MMi. This natural product promotes hygiene of the pig’s gut, explains Alain Reocreux, the international development manager. “When a pig eats, he not only gets the feed nutrients, he also gets some pathogens and toxins,” explains Reocreux. “MMi neutralizes those things in the gut, so he can make more efficient use of the nutrients.” Net result: 4% better feed efficiency, bringing our net gain to 30%. We’ve got a ways to go to get to complete feed-free pigs!

Now we’re outside the main exhibit hall, talking to Joe Slager of Key Dollar Manure Separator. This machine puts manure over a fine screen, which separates most of the bigger solids from the brown liquid. Slager tells me about one of their farmer customers in Illinois who feeds those screenings back to his gestating sows as 60% of their ration. That saves two pounds of feed per sow per day, 700 pounds per sow per year. Spread over the 20 pigs she produces, that’s a net gain of five percent in total feed efficiency.

Next, Scott Schneider of Aova Technologies tells me about his product, called, simply enough, Big Pig (their motto: Big is Better). Big Pig is a natural egg powder antibody that is added to nursery and finishing feeds at 1.5 pounds per ton. It targets an enzyme in the gut, which in turn reduces inflamation there to allow feed energy to go towards growth, he says. Their research shows a 3.5% improvement in feed efficiency. Since I don’t deal with decimal points, I round that up to four percent. Now we’re at 39% cumulative improvement in feed efficiency. Not even half way to 100%!

Now I’m hearing about MorindaMax, a feed additive for just-weaned pigs only and fed for those early weeks. Daryl Hammer gives me the brochure, which says: “MorindaMax’s active ingredient is Morinda citrifolia, which comes from the fruit of a tree native to the Pacific Region. Morinda c. consists of phytochemicals which are known to have protective or disease preventative properties.” OK, but what about the feed efficiency? The brochure says it gives 10% better efficiency in the nursery. I know that’s only for the short nursery period, but if I’m going to get to feed-free pigs, I’m going to have to cut some corners. Let’s just add it in, now we’re up to 49% improvement.

Feed Logic employees show me an incredible feed mixing machine that mounts on a ceiling rail inside a pig barn. That machine picks up feed ingredients at one end of the barn, than rolls along the rail to automatically dispense the feed into feeders in each pen. It mixes a slightly different feed formulation to each pen, depending on the size of the pig and the computer instructions that you, the operator, have given to it. In theory, this lets each pen of pigs get a different feed formulation each day as they grow up to market weight. Alas, I’m told that although this “smart” feeder saves $4 per pig in feed costs, they can’t show an improvement in feed efficiency.

At Lallemand Animal Nutrition, they tell me about their probiotic products, which promote the “good” bugs in a pig’s gut. They are getting ready to do a trial with one product, Bactocell, fed with distillers’ grains from ethanol plants. The Bactocell will help pigs better digest the fiber in the DDGs. They get a five-percent improvement in feed efficiency, bringing our net gain now up to 54%.

Schauer is an Austrian company that makes pig feeding equipment. One product is an individual sow feeder that, by reading an ear tag, feeds each animal exactly what you have programmed into the computer. It lets you house sows in a group situation, but feed them individually. Franz Bauer tells me that if I’m a poor manager (how did he peg me?), I can save at least 10% on sow feed. I know, that’s not the whole herd, it’s just the sow feed. Still, I’m going to add it in, and now we’re up to 64% better feed efficiency.

And we’re running out of options. I stop and visit with a half dozen companies that make automatic pig sorters. To get to the hog feeder, the pigs have to walk through a scales. Depending on their weight, it sorts them off into a feeder pen with just the right feed for their size. And when they’re big enough to sell, it puts them into yet another pen. The result is that pigs of various sizes can be kept in one big pen, and each gets just the feed he (or she) needs. In theory, this should give a good savings in feed efficiency, and keep pigs moving out to market before they get too big. But, nobody can give me hard (or even soft) numbers.
One more chance. There’s a booth at the far end of the exhibit hall, with nobody there. But it says it is the booth of the Northern Pulse Growers Association, promoting the feeding of peas. I pick up the brochure, and read the flyer called “Field Peas in Diets Fed to Swine.” Inside, it tells me that peas are about 23% crude protein, and higher in energy than soybean meal, almost nature’s perfect hog feed. Feeding peas rather than soybean meal might give a 3% boost to feed efficiency, it says. I’m going to add that, and get 67% improvement in feed efficiency, using all of these products that have been pitched.

Nope, hogs apparently won’t grow on air alone. It takes about two-thirds air, and one-third peas. Still, that’s not bad. You can now smugly tell your grain farmer neighbors, “If you think your corn is worth $6 a bushel, you can just keep it.”

Not every company with a booth or exhibit at the World Pork Expo in Des Moines this week claims that their product can save feed. But, a lot of them do.

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To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on cattle scalescattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

nationalhogfarmer.com

Managing young pigs in large group auto-sort (LGAS) systems poses challenges to pigs’ eating behavior. By ensuring that pigs have adequate room to access hog feeders and managing how they are introduced to the system, pigs can maintain feed intake and readily adjust to this housing system.

Pig behavior was studied in two LGAS systems to determine what adaptations were made at the Prairie Swine Centre Elstow Research Farm and in a commercial grow-finish operation. The Elstow facility housed approximately 250 pigs, with one feeder space per nine pigs. The commercial farm maintained groups of 650 pigs with 60 feeder spaces — a slightly higher feeder-space-to-pig ratio.

Big wheel hog feeder, available at barnworld.com.

At the Elstow research facility, the daily pattern of scale use, the use of individual feeder spaces within the food court, and the eating pattern of individual pigs were studied. Movements through the scale (hits) were studied using automated output from the auto-sort scale. All of the feeder spaces were photographed at five-minute intervals using a time-lapse camera. Ten pigs in each study group were paint-marked.

The study at the commercial farm also used output from the auto-sort scale, and supplemented this with live observations of four rooms of pigs for a 24-hour period. Pigs normally have a daily eating pattern with most of the eating taking place during the day.

Analyses of the photos of the feeder spaces showed a clear diurnal (daily) pattern, with an eight-fold increase in eating behavior during the daytime, compared to the low activity pattern at midnight.

Pigs in small groups typically have 10-15 well-defined “meals” in a day. Pigs in the LGAS had approximately five meals per day, but they were longer in duration than pigs in small group pens. There were no significant differences between average daily gain in LGAS systems compared to conventional small group housing. Comparable performance indicates that pigs can successfully adapt to the LGAS system.

The study at the commercial farm examined the change in eating behavior as pigs aged. Pigs studied in rooms varied six weeks in age. It was found that the average number of entrances into the food court each day decreased as the size (age) of the pigs increased, from nearly four entries per day at 88 lb., to about 2.5 visits per day at 198 lb.

The results show the diurnal pattern of eating by pigs, and shows that younger pigs had less of a dropoff in midday eating. These studies, compared to others, suggest that the younger pigs were limited in the number of feeder spaces and had to shift eating patterns from the normal peak periods to the less-intensive midday period.

Overall, pigs in large group auto-sort systems enter the food court 2-4 times each day and have fewer meals (5 vs. 10-15) than their small-pen counterparts. They compensate by increasing the length of their eating periods and move freely about the food court, eating from several pig feeders every day.

To ease the transition to large group systems, pigs should be introduced directly to the food court to make sure they know where the feed is located. The food court should be spacious so that pigs have access to all of the feeders; a feeder space should be provided for every 10-12 pigs.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

nationalhogfarmer.com

Poor hog feeder adjustment slashes feed efficiency by 5%, while properly adjusted feeders save about $2/pig from 50 to 270 lb., according to a recent study at Kansas State University. Keep feeders adjusted properly, regardless of trough space, to maintain good feed efficiency.

The 91-day study evaluated the effects of feeder trough space (1.75 vs. 3.5 in./pig) and minimum feeder-gap opening of 0.5 in. (narrow) vs. 1.0 in. (wide) on finishing pig performance. A total of 288 pigs went on test at 82 lb. in one of four treatments at the K-State Swine Teaching and Research Center, Manhattan, KS.

The hog feeders were adjusted to the minimum gap setting, but the agitation plate could be moved upward to a maximum gap setting of 0.75 in. or 1.25 in. Narrow feeder gap was 0.5 in. minimum to 0.75 in. maximum. Wide feeder gap was 1.0 in. minimum to 1.25 in. maximum.

Feeder trough space was adjusted by placing eight or 16 pigs/pen. For the 3.5 in. of feeder space/pig, pens were stocked with eight pigs/pen. To achieve the 1.75 in. of feeder space/pig, two pens were combined with only one feeder for the 16 pigs. Gating was adjusted so that both of the groups of eight or 16 pigs/pen got 8 sq. ft. of space/pig.

Pigs were given ad-lb access to feed and water and fed a four-phase, corn-soybean meal-based diet containing 20% distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS), as depicted in Table 1.

Pig performance on feed was calculated by weighing pigs and measuring feed disappearance on Day 0, 14, 28, 42, 56, 70, 84 and 91. Pictures of feeder pan coverage were taken once during each feeding phase, and a panel of four judges scored the feeder pan pictures by the percentage of pan coverage.

Evaluations of feeder pan coverage indicated narrow-adjusted pig feeders averaged approximately 48% coverage (Figure 1), while wide-adjusted feeders averaged approximately 85% coverage (Figure 2).

From Day 0 to 56, no feeder adjustment/trough space interactions were observed. However, those pigs exposed to the wide feeder gap setting had increased average daily feed intake (ADFI), which resulted in a tendency for poorer feed conversion, suggesting that the increase in feed intake with the wider feeder gap setting, actually produced an increase in feed wastage (Table 2).

From Day 56 to 91, there was a tendency for pigs with 3.5 in. feeder space to have greater average daily gain, compared to pigs with the 1.75 in. feeder space. Also, pigs tested on the wide feeder gap setting had increased ADFI and poorer feed efficiency, similar to the response observed during Day 0 to 56 (Table 2).

Overall, these results suggest that, regardless of feeder trough space, pigs fed with the wide feeder adjustment wasted more feed and grew less efficiently.

Further evidence is needed to determine optimal feeder trough space for finishing pigs.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

cattlenetwork.com

Corn
Trends
Short Term: Down
Net Long Futures and Options: 154796
Long Term: Down
Change: -6000
Overnight Trade: U -10 3/4 Z -12 3/4
Opening Calls: Higher

The corn numbers weren’t as negative as feared. Ending stocks estimates for both the old crop and new crop were higher than last month at 880 and 870 million respectively, which was expected, but not as high as the average trade guesses. New crop ending stocks are still below 1 billion, which is a psychological boost, and will return the focus of the market to the weather, which at the moment is turning more bullish.


Wheat
Trends
Short Term: Down

Net Long Futures and Options: -51255
Long Term: Down
Change: -3000
Overnight Trade: Chicago: U -12 3/4 KC: U -10 1/4
Opening Calls: Higher

The wheat numbers ended up being friendly with the new crop ending stocks estimate actually falling below last month at 670 million. Surprisingly, to me at least, was that this was not because of lower production. Production was actually increased, but the demand figures were increased enough, particularly exports, to offset the higher production. This should allow for a decent short covering rally in the wheat.


Soybeans
Trends
Short Term: Up Net Long Futures and Options: 33449
Long Term: Down Change: +1000
Overnight Trade: U -11 X-11 1/4
Opening Calls: Mixed

The soybean figures were slightly negative with the old crop ending stocks at 200 million and new crop at 175. Since the numbers were really close to expectations I think that the weather will be a lot more important that the report today and the rest of the week. The heat moving into the corn belt should be supportive to the market.

Live Cattle
Trend
Short Term: Up
Long Term: Up
Opening Calls: 10-30 Lower

Live cattle futures closed steady to moderately higher on Monday, as traders ignored slumping world economic concerns to rally from sharply lower opening trade. Limit higher move in the August lean hog contract provided support. Hogs are higher on rumors of large exports into China. Less competing meat into the fourth quarter should provide excellent support for the fat cattle market. Overnight markets have trimmed back most of Monday’s gains. equities continue to struggle.

Feeder Cattle
Trends
Short Term: Up
Long Term: Up
Opening Call: 30-50 Lower

Feeder cattle futures posted moderate to stout gains on Monday, supported by lower corn and higher fats. Cash feeders continue to support, at near record high levels. This mornings’ grain supply/demand report could change opening calls for the feeders. Expectations for a low June placement number will add support.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

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haybar.co.uk

Hay Bars’ introduction has truly revolutionised a lot of large yards. The initial investment is quickly recouped by reduced waste and reduction in ‘man hours’ spent laboriously filling hay nets.

HayBar pony feeder

Hay and haylage are the recognised feed but now we have even more choice with many different bagged forage products designed to cater for horses with various feeding problems. COPD, laminitics, dental abnormalities and horses with digestive problems all benefit from bagged forage. How to contain these chop like forages is made easier with Hay Bar. The new version Pony Hay Bar is ideal as it is even easier to clean out when feeding these hay replacements.

Feeding from the floor in the natural position is an aid to maintaining clear sinuses and helps to alleviate back and neck problems. Dental abnormalities are seen far less frequently in horses fed from Hay Bars. Both horse and owner benefit from the Hay Bar system, and with the reduced labour costs and reduction in waste of both bedding and forage, make it an investment that more than pays for itself.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

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