Posts Tagged ‘hay feeder’

ehow.com

Owning a horse is a time-consuming yet rewarding experience. Horses are sensitive and intelligent creatures that require a lot of attention and maintenance from regular vet visits to routine grooming. However, for people who truly enjoy owning a horse, the maintenance becomes second nature and grooming becomes another act of bonding between horse and owner. By following the proper steps involved in caring for a horse, you ensure that your horse stays happy and healthy.

Instructions

1. Get a veterinarian. Contact a veterinarian in your area that specializes in horses. Set up your vet appointment before you get your horse. Horses need regular shots for rhino flu every 8 weeks, rabies and Potomac fever shots twice a year and past wormer every 4 to 6 weeks. Getting a veterinarian involved before getting your horse ensures that your horse receives the proper care from the beginning.

2. Set up your stable. Provide the horse with a stable that features stalls that are at least 10-by-10 feet. Get rid of any exposed electrical wires. Place straw bedding in the horse’s stall. Provide ample ventilation in the stable, as well as feed and water buckets. Clean the horse stalls and stable every day. Provide fresh straw daily.

3. Provide a large pasture. Horses need at least one and a half acres of land for roaming and grazing. Fix any fence holes or broken gates before allowing your horse in the pasture.

4. Feed and keep your horse hydrated. Place feed and water buckets in the pasture and in the stable. Provide plenty of oats, grains and commercial feed on top of the pasture grass the horse grazes on. Feed the horse according to its needs. Observe the horse’s feeding habits during the first couple weeks after bringing it home. Adjust the feed according to how much your horse consumes. Provide clean, fresh water to the horse several times a day. Clean out the hay feeder, feeding buckets or troughs at least once a week and the water buckets every day.

5. Groom the horse. Regularly groom the horse after each ride. Brush the horse. Keep the tail and mane untangled. Use the proper brushes when brushing the horse. Wash the horse with horse shampoo or soap at least once a week.

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For more information about cattle guards, cattle scales, and saddle pads, please visit our Barn World informational site.

For more information about hog feeders, grain weight conversion, and hay feeders, please visit our Barn World informational site.

For more information about livestock scales, bulk feed bins, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit our Barn World informational site.

by Bob Coleman | kentuckyhorse.org

While feeding hay to horses is certainly a common practice, what can horse owners do to control waste? It is certainly easy to just throw the hay on the ground and let the horses clean it up. However, this method of feeding can result in significant amounts of wasted feed due to trampling and soiling of the hay.

How can horse owners reduce waste? The simple answer is to use a suitable hay feeder. One feeder that can be used for 2-3 horses at one time is a simple box. The feeder is made with a 2 x 4 lumber frame covered with ¾ inch plywood. The dimensions for this feeder are 4’ wide, 6’ long and 2’ high. If you lay this out carefully, you only need two sheets of 4’ x 8’ plywood. Horse owners can cover the edges of the feeder with something like sheet rock strips to reduce the incidence of wood chewing. Make sure the metal strips have no sharp edges.

The Hay Hopper Round Bale Feeder for Sheep and Goats saves you money by eliminating waste. Get your at barnworld.com.

With this box feeder, be careful to only feed what the horses need for a day. This regular feeding schedule can also aid in controlling waste as the amount of hay in the feeder at one time will not exceed the capacity of the feeder.

Will horses still root out some hay while feeding? Yes, that does happen but in general, using a suitable feeder results in 5-7% waste while no feeder results in 20-35% waste. Hay is expensive and controlling waste results in saving feed and reduced feed costs. With three horses being fed 20 lbs of hay a day, they waste 30%; that is 6 lbs of hay per horse per day. The horse owner will need to either feed more hay to meet requirements and account for the hay being wasted or the horses will lose weight because their requirements are not being met. Common reasons for feeding on the ground are because it is natural for the horse to eat from the ground and they clean it all up before I feed more. While the feeding at a low level may be similar to the natural grazing of the horse, cleaning it all up does not happen as much as we would like it to.

Controlling hay loss because of waste helps reduce feed cost and in no time, the feeder is paid for with those savings.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

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by Ed Haag | agriculture.com

Extension beef specialist Dan Faulkner admits that when he and his colleagues from the University of Illinois and Iowa State University began collecting data from 225 commercial herds in an effort to better understand what factors had the greatest impact on profitability, few would have predicted that one factor would emerge heads above the rest. “About 56% of the variation in profitability was attributable to feed and hay costs,” he says. “It was a huge factor in determining profitability.”

For Faulkner and others who reviewed the survey results, the data was telling. “To me, if feed costs explain over 50% of the variation in profit, it is the one producers should really focus on,” he says.

One beef scientist who took notice of what the Illinois and Iowa survey revealed was Dan Buskirk, department of animal science, Michigan State University (MSU). For him, there was an obvious follow-up question: What was the specific reason for the variations in profitability in relation to feeding costs?

Buskirk then recalled one of his school’s livestock educators saying that he had observed a marked difference in how effective specific types of round hay feeders were at controlling waste.

Open bottom hay feeder - 20 gauge frame, available at barnworld.com.

After checking the existing literature, Buskirk discovered very little had been published on the subject in recent years. But one study completed in the 1980s showed that losses of hay due to the way it was fed could reach 20% to 30% of the dry matter fed.

New research needed

With several unique designs for large bale feeders in use (with more than one claiming reduced waste potential), Buskirk was curious to see if those claims would stand up under scientific scrutiny. He was particularly interested in how cattle behaved when they were accessing the different feeders. He believed that a better understanding of the relationship between feeder design and animal behavior could provide an opportunity for more efficient feed use and also enhance animal performance and well-being.

Based on his initial findings and the encouragement of his colleagues, Buskirk formed a research team to evaluate four of the most commonly used round bale feeders: the cone feeder, the ring feeder, the trailer feeder, and the cradle feeder. The team would also monitor the feeding behavior for each feeder design and the relationship between feeding behavior, feeder design, and feed loss.

A group of 160 nonlactating, pregnant beef cows from the MSU herd were used to evaluate the quantity of hay loss and feeding behaviors from different round bale feeders.

These animals were split into eight groups of 20 and assigned by weight and body condition score to one of eight pens with the four feeder designs being evaluated. All feeder types provided approximately 37 cm linear feeder space per animal.

Prior to feeding, the round bales were weighed and sampled. During the study, the hay that fell onto the concrete surrounding the feeder was considered waste and was collected and sampled daily. After seven days, each hay feeder type was assigned to a different pen for seven more days.

Because Buskirk felt any discrepancy in waste between feeders would probably be traced back to cattle interaction around the units, he added an animal behavior component to his study. “I knew if we had differences, the next question would be why,” he says. “So at the onset of the project, working with our animal behaviorist, Adroaldo Zanella, we set up video cameras to record the cattle interaction around the feeders.”

No shortage of surprises

For Buskirk and his team, there were surprises once the data was processed. The feeder to receive the highest marks was the cone feeder with a dry matter hay loss of 3.5%, followed by the ring feeder with 6.1%, the trailer feeder with 11.4%, and the cradle feeder with 14.6%.

“My guess before the study was that the cradle feeder would prove the best at reducing waste because any hay that wasn’t consumed over the feeder would drop back down to the bottom of the cradle,” says Buskirk. What he hadn’t calculated when making his prediction was that boss cow behavior would even trump what seemed like a well-designed system.

“We found that with the cradle feeder cows tended to walk alongside of it and butt several cows out of the way at the same time,” he says. “When that happens a cow backs up and drops half of what she is eating on the ground.”

He points out this behavior was observed with both the cradle and the trailer feeder but was nearly absent with the cone and the ring feeders.

Researchers found cattle interaction wasn’t the only reason for excessive waste. Individual cow feeding behavior could result in increased hay loss if it wasn’t controlled by feeder design.

“Round feeders were set lower, which allowed cattle to put their heads directly in the feeder,” says Buskirk. He notes that this offered a more natural grazing position and encouraged the cattle to keep their heads in the feeders throughout much of the process.

“In contrast, with flat-sided feeders, they tended to reach in, grab a mouthful of hay, and pull their heads out to chew it. In the process, some hay ended up on the ground,” he says.

Similarly, feeder designs that required cattle to access hay from under a top rail were far less likely to waste hay since cows didn’t toss it over their backs or along their sides.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

hoofcareunltd.com

Slow feeding is important, but continuous slow feeding is much more important.

Continuous slow feeding does not work until your horse has forgotten that there is an end to the hay supply. As long as he remembers that there might be an end to the supply of hay he will most likely still eat too fast and not chew the food enough. Chewing is extremely important for a horse. It is when he has chewed enough he feels content, not when he has filled his stomach. If he does not chew enough he will not be able to digest the food the way he is supposed to. When the Continuous slow feeding starts to work your horse will show you both more harmony and more willingness to work. He might also be friendlier to other horses and easier to handle.

Horse Hay Feeder - 3 Piece Round 8ft w/Steel Lower Enclosure - 16 gauge frame. (Picture courtesy of www.barnworld.com)

It is extremely important that your horse never can fill his mouth with hay. When your horse fills his mouth with food he will not chew it enough and the digestion will therefore not be effective. Fantastic things happen when he has learned to eat the natural way. He will even graze differently after a winter with a well working “continuous slow feeder”. This is much better than spreading the hay on the ground since it is much to easy to eat hay that is loose on the ground or on the floor. One small piece of hay at a time is the goal!

Continuous slow feeding restricts the amount of hay your horse can eat per minute instead of the amount of hay available to him. You will gain in all ends.

  • No more wasted hay.
  • Less consumption because of better digestion.
  • Your horse is kept busy eating 16-20 hours as he is supposed to.
  • Obese horses usually loose weight.
  • Thin horses usually gain weight.
  • No more fighting over food since it is always available.
  • No specific feeding times for you to keep (no early mornings or lunch feedings).
  • Your horse will never be hungry and always ready to go.

Important things to consider:

There must be hay available to the horse at all times. 1½ hours after the horse has stopped eating the unstoppable production of bile (the horse has no gall bladder, he produces and releases bile continuously) will burn the inside of the small intestine and give the horse stomach ulcers.

It is not until the horse has forgotten that the hay feeder ever can be empty that the feeding system starts to work. Then the horses slow down their eating pace, take the pauses they need and each horse in the herd takes care of their individual eating needs (we have Shetland ponies and horses eat together from the same feeders).

Give your horse three weeks to get used to this new way of being fed before passing any judgments.

If you want to know how much they are eating you must look at the average consumption over a three day period because they do not necessarily eat as much every day.

Things not to do:

Do not feed servings or portions in the hay feeders.

If you believe your horse still gets too much you can always mix the hay with oat straw of good hygienic quality. If you are absolutely sure your horse needs more get hay that contains more (but be careful with alfalfa since the balance between calcium and phosphor is completely off).

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

cattlenetwork.com

Corn
Trends
Short Term: Down
Net Long Futures and Options: 154796
Long Term: Down
Change: -6000
Overnight Trade: U -10 3/4 Z -12 3/4
Opening Calls: Higher

The corn numbers weren’t as negative as feared. Ending stocks estimates for both the old crop and new crop were higher than last month at 880 and 870 million respectively, which was expected, but not as high as the average trade guesses. New crop ending stocks are still below 1 billion, which is a psychological boost, and will return the focus of the market to the weather, which at the moment is turning more bullish.


Wheat
Trends
Short Term: Down

Net Long Futures and Options: -51255
Long Term: Down
Change: -3000
Overnight Trade: Chicago: U -12 3/4 KC: U -10 1/4
Opening Calls: Higher

The wheat numbers ended up being friendly with the new crop ending stocks estimate actually falling below last month at 670 million. Surprisingly, to me at least, was that this was not because of lower production. Production was actually increased, but the demand figures were increased enough, particularly exports, to offset the higher production. This should allow for a decent short covering rally in the wheat.


Soybeans
Trends
Short Term: Up Net Long Futures and Options: 33449
Long Term: Down Change: +1000
Overnight Trade: U -11 X-11 1/4
Opening Calls: Mixed

The soybean figures were slightly negative with the old crop ending stocks at 200 million and new crop at 175. Since the numbers were really close to expectations I think that the weather will be a lot more important that the report today and the rest of the week. The heat moving into the corn belt should be supportive to the market.

Live Cattle
Trend
Short Term: Up
Long Term: Up
Opening Calls: 10-30 Lower

Live cattle futures closed steady to moderately higher on Monday, as traders ignored slumping world economic concerns to rally from sharply lower opening trade. Limit higher move in the August lean hog contract provided support. Hogs are higher on rumors of large exports into China. Less competing meat into the fourth quarter should provide excellent support for the fat cattle market. Overnight markets have trimmed back most of Monday’s gains. equities continue to struggle.

Feeder Cattle
Trends
Short Term: Up
Long Term: Up
Opening Call: 30-50 Lower

Feeder cattle futures posted moderate to stout gains on Monday, supported by lower corn and higher fats. Cash feeders continue to support, at near record high levels. This mornings’ grain supply/demand report could change opening calls for the feeders. Expectations for a low June placement number will add support.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

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agriculture.com

With temperatures expected to reach dangerous highs this week in the middle of the country, Iowa State University (ISU) Extension beef veterinarian Grant Dewell urges beef cattle producers to prepare for these weather conditions to maintain herd health.

Facts you should know

  • Feedlot cattle are at higher risk than pastured cattle, which have the ability to seek shade and avoid radiant heat from dirt or concrete surfaces.
  • Temperatures exceeding 80 degrees F cause physiologic stress on cattle. Though they are not at risk of dying, their health can deteriorate.
  • Compared to other animals, cattle cannot dissipate their heat load effectively due to their inability to sweat.
  • Cattle’s core temperature peaks 2 hours after peak environmental temperature.
  • It takes at least 6 hours for cattle to dissipate their heat load.
  • Black cattle and heavy cattle and respiratory compromised cattle have an increased risk of heat stress, and higher chances of death.

Managing the heat

Careful monitoring: Don’t work cattle at all in high heat. Finish working cattle before 9 to 10 a.m. during the summer. Do not work cattle in the evenings after it has cooled off. It takes at least 6 hours for cattle to recover from their heat load. Cattle should not wait in processing areas longer than 30 minutes.

Water requirements: Cattle lose water more quickly from increased respiration and perspiration when it’s hot. Consuming water is the only way cattle can reduce core body temperature. Cattle need 3 inches of linear water space per head during the summer. The supply should be able to deliver 1.1% of body weight of the cattle per hour. A 1,000-pound animal needs about 1.5 gallons of water per hour. Introducing extra water tanks before extreme heat will allow cattle to become accustomed to them.

Feeding changes: Cattle should not be fed in the morning when body heat will peak when environmental temperatures are also at their highest (midday). Cattle should receive at least 70% of their feed 2 to 4 hours after the day’s peak temperatures. Changing the ration is controversial, but the general recommendation is to reduce the diet energy content of feed by 5 to 7%.

Shade and ventilation: There should be 20 to 40 square feet of shade per animal. Shade structures are most adequate when they have an east-west orientation and are more than 8 feet off the ground to heighten air movement. Removing tall vegetation within 150 feet of the feedlot pens will also expose cattle to more air movement.

Cooling techniques: Sprinklers can cool cattle during times of stress by increasing evaporative cooling and reducing ground temperature. Sprinklers are adequate when they wet the animal and not just mist the air. Sprinklers should not interfere with drinking water supply. Use sprinklers intermittently to avoid mud and increased humidity. Assess water temperature: thermal shock from too cold of water can kill cattle that are extremely stressed. Once sprinklers are utilized, they should be continued until the heat is over.

Fly control will also reduce cattle stress. Biting flies cause cattle to bunch up, decreasing cooling. Minimize breeding areas for flies and apply insecticides to decrease fly populations before heat stress.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

haybar.co.uk

Hay Bars’ introduction has truly revolutionised a lot of large yards. The initial investment is quickly recouped by reduced waste and reduction in ‘man hours’ spent laboriously filling hay nets.

HayBar pony feeder

Hay and haylage are the recognised feed but now we have even more choice with many different bagged forage products designed to cater for horses with various feeding problems. COPD, laminitics, dental abnormalities and horses with digestive problems all benefit from bagged forage. How to contain these chop like forages is made easier with Hay Bar. The new version Pony Hay Bar is ideal as it is even easier to clean out when feeding these hay replacements.

Feeding from the floor in the natural position is an aid to maintaining clear sinuses and helps to alleviate back and neck problems. Dental abnormalities are seen far less frequently in horses fed from Hay Bars. Both horse and owner benefit from the Hay Bar system, and with the reduced labour costs and reduction in waste of both bedding and forage, make it an investment that more than pays for itself.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

haybar.co.uk

Hay Bars’ natural feeding position has received endorsements from the dental profession. Keith Evans Eq DT “I am convinced that I would see less dental problems in horses I treat if they were fed from the floor by use of the Hay Bar. It is common sense to get the horse to eat in the way that he is designed for. We impact the horses’ environment in so many ways it can only be of benefit to offer him some form of normality in his daily life. ”

HayBar pony feeder

Wayne Abbott B.E.V.A./B.V.D.A. “One of the most important things I advise my clients is that horses benefit significantly from being able to eat at ground level when stabled. In my experience horses that are not fed from nets or racks maintain a far more balanced wear pattern to their teeth enabling them to grind properly and in turn gain full value from their food. The Hay Bar offers a practical solution to being able to provide hay/haylage in their stable and it also helps prevent bedding contamination”

Hay Bar has truly improved the quality of life for horses and owners a like. At this time of year when horses are stabled for most of their day it is important to keep their environment as natural as possible. Hay Bar helps to make this possible and also save on time and waste.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

kirihawkins/themedialords.com

Livestock scales were created for the weighing of large farmyard animals such as horses, sheep, and cattle. These scales are designed to be able to withstand and accurately weigh animals that weigh several tons. Needless to say, that type of weight measurement can not be achieved on standard bathroom scales or even typical veterinary scales which are designed to weigh small and midsized animals such as dogs and cats.

Livestock scales play a large part in the lives of veterinarians who specialize in the health care of farm animals. It is important to have such a scale on hand to readily be able to weigh animals who are perceived to be ill. These scales also play a big role in the upkeep of healthy animals in zoos around the world. You might be amused to know that the same scale used to weigh cows can also be used to weigh crocodiles.

Many times, and probably more often than not, animals who step onto the livestock scales will not stay still for the time that it would take to get an accurate measurement from a traditional scale. Manufacturers of such scales have kept that in mind and design these scales with weight average and hold options that can help to ensure accurate measurements whether the animal is moving about on top of the scale or not. This is essential in making sure that animals are weighed correctly.

Livestock scales are also commonly used on farms where livestock is frequently bought and sold or raised for profit. Needless to say, these types of scales need to be incredibly durable to withstand harsh farm conditions. Most heavy duty livestock scales designed to be used on farms are water resistant to protect them from rain and animal waste. Typically, their sensors are made of durable stainless steel, also a precautionary measure when dealing with animals that can behave in an unpredictable manner.

As you can see, livestock scales can be found in more places than just the veterinarians office. Many farmers would not be able to make due without them.

There are several different types of livestock scales on the market designed for different weight ranges and with different features. All models are typically very durable for their purpose, but some have added features for different weighing situations.

You may be surprised to know that livestock scales aren’t as expensive as some people think, with small scales designed to weigh animals of 700 pounds and lighter starting at around $250. Many scales that weigh animals up to 2,000 pounds cost under $1,000. The price is all dependent upon the manufacturer of the scale and what functionality that you need the scale to perform.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

must check the zero balance of the scale or reweigh a livestock draft when requested by such persons.

Registrants, packers, and the weighers they employ must comply with a request by any authorized P&SP agent to reweigh livestock or livestock carcasses, so P&SP can determine if the weights recorded by the scale are accurate. False weighing is a criminal offense. Legal action may be brought if incorrect weighing is found.

GIPSA (Grain Inspection and Packers and Stockyards Administration (sometimes referred to as P&S) requires Market Agencies (such as Superior Livestock Auction), Dealers (order buyers), Livestock Markets (stockyards, livestock auctions) and Packers to weigh livestock and/or grain on scales that have been tested and certified within six months prior to use. They also require that complete weighing records are maintained and on file. All video/internet auctions, dealers, order buyers, sale barns, packers, grain dealers, et al. are regulated by GIPSA (P&S) and all are required to comply with GIPSA regulations.

Most states also have regulations with regard to scales used for commerce and the majority of the states require that scales be tested and certified annually; however, federal regulations override the state regulations on this issue and failure to comply with the GIPSA regulations can result in the assessment of significant fines. Marketing Agencies, Dealers, Livestock Markets, Packers, etc. have no control over this. All cattle that are weighed must be weighed on scales that have been tested and certified within six months of weighing. Communication with the rancher or seller about the scale issue is critical. If the scale they plan to weigh on is not compliant, a compliant scale should be located, or make arrangements to have it tested and certified prior to the delivery of cattle. Contact other people in the livestock industry in your area and work together to help ranchers, co-ops, truck scales, etc. become compliant with GIPSA regulations. This may require financial assistance on your part, but it may be necessary so as to avoid being assessed with fines and other penalties from GIPSA. This applies to everyone in the industry that weighs livestock or grain for commerce. The following update and clarification on the scale regulation specific to seasonal scales was released recently by GIPSA. The information can be accessed via the web at the following websites:Clarification Statement, Federal Register Notice. Below is the statement from the GIPSA website and following that is the notice from the Federal Register. P&SP’s mission in the area of accurate weights consists of two elements that affect the integrity of livestock and poultry transactions: (1) the accuracy of the scales used for weighing livestock, meat, and poultry, and (2) the proper and honest operation of scales to ensure that the weight on which a transaction is based is accurate. The major emphases in the enforcement of this program are the monitoring of scale tests and the detection of improper and fraudulent use of subject scales. Scale Testing Requirements Stockyard owners, market agencies, dealers (including video auctions), packers, or live poultry dealers that weigh livestock, live poultry, or feed, must have their scales tested at least twice each calendar year (section 201.72(a) (9 CFR 201.72(a)). This requirement for twice a year testing also applies to swine contractors and has been in place in some form since September 24, 1984 (49 FR 37374). On January 20, 2011, GIPSA published a rule (76 FR 3485) to better define scale testing requirements. This new rule specifies that one of the two scale tests must occur between January 1 and June 30 of the calendar year and the second must occur between July 1 and December 31 of the calendar year. A minimum of 120 days is required between these two tests. More frequent testing is required for scales that do not maintain accuracy between tests. Example (for a scale used throughout the year): A scale is tested for the first time in 2011 on April 15, meeting the requirement of a test between January 1 and June 30. The second test needs to be between July 1 and December 31 and more than 120 days after the first test or in this case August 13, 2011. So the second test must occur between August 13 and December 31, 2011. In this new rule, GIPSA has provided an exception for the testing of scales used on a limited seasonal basis, which we have recently clarified A seasonal scale is one used during any continuous 6-month period.

GIPSA requires that seasonal scales be tested once during the calendar year and that the test have been conducted within 6 months prior to its use. Example (seasonal): If a scale is tested on April 15, that test is valid until October 15 and you can use the scale throughout that period. If you want to use the scale after October 15, you would need to have another test conducted and the scale would no longer be considered a seasonal scale for that year.

Instructions for Testing Livestock and Animal Scales Regulations(read more) issued under authority of the P&S Act require that persons weighing livestock and live poultry for purposes of purchase or sale under the P&S Act perform their duties in accordance with official instructions.

Responsibility for Accurate Scales and Livestock Weights, What are the Penalties for Violations under the P&S Act? Administrative and civil penalties for violations of the P&S Act include cease and desist orders, civil penalties not more than $11,000 for each violation, and suspensions of registrations under the P&S Act. Any person found guilty of any of the following criminal offenses against the United States is subject to a fine, imprisonment, or both: Makes false entries in records or accounts; Neglects to make true; correct entries; Mutilates, alters, or falsifies any documentary evidence required to be kept; Refuses to allow inspection of records by
authorized agents.

Weighers, who willfully print or enter a false weight on a scale ticket or other record of a registrant or packer, are subject to the penalties under the P&S Act.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.