Posts Tagged ‘feed bin’

omafra.gov.on.ca

How Fruit Size Effects Amount Needed To Fill the Bin

Perhaps the most common thought in the minds of picking crews after they have gone through a well-managed block of apples could be “larger apples fill bins much quicker than average size fruit.”

This idea is easily substantiated. Table 1 gives you some idea of relative fruit size and numbers needed to fill the bin. It takes 2000 apples of 3 1/8 inch diameter (100 count size) to fill a bin.

To fill the same bin with 2 ¾-inch diameter (138-count size) fruit, you have to reach for and handle 2760 apples per bin. Although a 2 ¾-inch apple isn’t a bad size, time and costs increase when smaller fruit is handled.

Table 1. Number of Apples to Fill Bins (Based on 20 bu/bin and 42 lb/bu)

Worksheet Example:

1000 trees/acre x 30 apples/tree = 30, 000 apples/acre = 30, 000 apples
There are 2000 apples per bin of 100 count size.

number of apples ÷ number per bin = 30,000 ÷ 2,000 = 15 bins

Tree Density Factor Chart

Fruit Size Factor Chart

Example: Grower has a density of 600 trees/acre and has 40 apples of avg. 125-count size/tree.

The grower needs:
Bins needed = 40(apples/tree) x 0.3(tree density factor) x 0.8(fruit size factor) = 9.6 or 10 bins

Three Factors That Make Up Crop Volume

Three factors make up crop volume: tree numbers, fruit numbers, and fruit size. If fruit size and crop load is fairly uniform in a higher-density planting, you can easily estimate yield. For example, if you have a tree density of 1000 trees/acre, and each tree carries 30 apples of 100-count size; you would need about 15 bins to accommodate the yield from one acre.

At 1000 trees/acre, the bin requirement is equal to half the number of apples per tree if the fruit is 100 count size.

At 500 trees/acre, the number of bins you would need equals one quarter the number of apples per tree. For sizes less than 100 count size (1x), you would multiply by a fruit factor which accounts for a 10% volume reduction for every 1/8-inch loss of size.

The Importance of Thinning for a Standard Distribution

Fruit size in a well-thinned crop generally follows a standard distribution. Most of the crop will be of the desired size classes while a smaller percentage of fruit will be much larger or much smaller than the bulk of the fruit making up the crop.

Bins/acre = apples/tree x tree density factor x fruit size factor

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For more information about cattle guards, cattle scales, and saddle pads, please visit our Barn World informational site.

For more information about hog feeders, grain weight conversion, and hay feeders, please visit our Barn World informational site.

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by Lora Berg | nationalhogfarmer.com

Wasting the equivalent of a feeder’s worth of feed by running it into a manure pit can definitely have a negative impact on feed efficiency.

Making sure equipment is properly maintained is just one example of the ways the person working in the barn can impact feed efficiency. Mike Tokach, Kansas State University (KSU), says focusing on specific tasks prior to loading a barn with new pigs, during the loading phase, while doing daily chores, and again when the barn is unloaded can have a positive influence on feed efficiency.

Prior to Entry

A clean barn includes clean feeders. Before a new group of pigs enters a barn, the feed bins should be emptied to ensure pigs can start on appropriate diets. “A late finishing diet has a 40% lower lysine level than a grower diet. Obviously, feed efficiency is not going to be very good if you start pigs out on a diet that is 40% below their lysine requirement,” Tokach says.

Feed bunk 12' with slant bar panel, for hay, grain, mineral and silage. To check our complete line of hog feeders please visit us at barnworld.com.

In addition to thoroughly cleaning the facility, check and repair feed handling equipment. Look for leaking bins, broken feed lines and inoperable feeder adjustment rods. Grease the bearings on equipment between groups and take care of any previous “temporary” fixes.

“Duct tape is a short-term repair. If you don’t take the time to make the permanent repair before the next group of pigs enters the barn, you could end up with a disaster,” Tokach says. In addition, check fans, fan covers and louvers, sprinklers, heaters, curtains, insulation and waterers as part of the regular maintenance schedule between groups.

Loading the Barn

While loading the new group into the barn, do not sort pigs into tight weight categories. “Studies show a negative effect on growth performance when sorting pigs into light, medium and heavy categories because the pigs fight more compared to pigs that have not been sorted by weight range,” he explains. Care should be taken to not overstock pens or leave too many open pens. Some feeders may not work well if pigs are not placed on both sides of a fenceline feeder.

Daily Chores

Attention to detail while doing daily chores can help improve feed efficiency. Making sure pigs are healthy, implementing euthanasia plans in a timely manner and making sure pigs have water available at all times are important steps.

Tokach encourages barn managers and growers to follow correct feed budgets and take note of amino acid levels, proper energy levels and how fiber content and withdrawal of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) can influence feed efficiency on a carcass basis. Tools are available from many feed companies to help manage feed budgets.

Managing the pigs’ environment means maintaining air quality and minimizing heat stress and cold temperatures. “Studies have shown a negative impact on feed efficiency from going above or below a pig’s critical temperature,” Tokach says. “Undergoing heat stress takes energy and results in poor feed efficiency, too. It goes back to barn maintenance. Make sure the fans and sprinkler systems are all working properly before hot weather and high critical temperatures become a problem.”

Feeder Adjustment

Proper feeder adjustment plays a crucial role in feed efficiency. Tokach recommends 50% pan coverage for most dry feeders now instead of previous recommendations for 15-25% pan coverage. He says if there is adequate to excess feeder space, opening feeders too much can increase feed disappearance and result in poorer feed efficiency, particularly after approximately 150 lb. However, if pigs are restricted on feeder space, opening feeders will increase average daily feed intake and average daily gain.

Touching on feeder design, Tokach generally recommends that feeders be at least 14 in. wide, or the shoulder width of a pig right before market, and approximately 10 in. deep. “It is important that the pig is able to eat freely without rubbing its head on the storage compartment of the feeder while eating,” he says.

While feeder dividers can make it more difficult to adjust feeders, they do allow more pigs to eat at one time because pigs are forced to stand perpendicular to the hog feeder.

Unloading the Barn

Unloading the barn is yet another area where a barn manager can have a tremendous impact on feed efficiency. Tokach says savings can be made by withdrawing feed 12 to 18 hours prior to pigs being processed at the slaughter plant. “You don’t ever want the pigs off feed for more than 24 hours before processing. Time in transit and holding at the plant should be included in the calculation of time off feed,”
he says.

Tokach also recommends pulling some pigs from all pens when marketing. “Research shows topping off the barn improves growth rate of all remaining pigs in the pen. By pulling 16% of pigs from the pen, substantial feed savings of 13 lb./pig were realized while producing the same total market weight in one research trial,” he relates.

Remember to handle pigs with care at every step in the production process. Each 0.5% increase in mortality increases closeout feed efficiency by 0.02 because less weight will be marketed.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

by J. Carr | thepigsite.com

Summary

In a time of record feed prices, it is essential that feed wastage be minimized. It is estimated that 10% of feed delivered is wasted on the average farm. On a 250 sow unit, this can be more than 150 tonnes of feed per year (whole farm – farrow to finish – feed consumption at 6.3 tonnes per sow per year). Feed is wasted along the entire feed line from field to rectum!

This article details some of the areas where this wastage occurs at the farm level and focuses on simple management practices to reduce this waste. Reducing feed wastage by half would amount to a reduction in cost of 8-9 AuCents/kg deadweight – Au$6.30 per pig sold (70kg dead weight, head off – Western Australia norm). This could be the difference between profit and loss on many farms. (Calculation: 7.5 tonnes x Au$377 average feed price divided by (250 x 20 x 70kg) dead weight).

Where is feed wasted?

Feed distribution system and storage

  • Feed bin management

Avoid unnecessary waste while cleaning feed bins. Leaving spilt feed under the bin only encourages rodents and vermin to the farm – which then consume their own share of feed. Routinely and regularly check the outside and inside of feed bins and their distribution systems.

  • Feed bin filling

When the feed bin is being filled, avoid all wasted and spilt feed. Once the feed has been delivered, ensure that the feed bins are properly re-sealed.

Mini Feed Bin with Collar and Slide Valve - 40 Bushel, available at barnworld.com.

  • Feed spillage

Manage and understand feed movement within a feed bin and ensure that feed spillages do not occur. If a pig is without feed for 24 hours, a gastric ulcer may occur. This results in poor feed digestion and leakage of blood, which has to be replaced – a chronic feed wastage. Pigs going without feed for more than 6 hours is extremely common on pig farms – to the point where it is a normal occurrence at least once in every batch of pigs produced.

  • Feed storage

Creep feed should not be exposed to temperature extremes for if it gets hot, it might go stale. A typical example of this is “storing” creep feed within the hot nursery, making the feeding easier for the stockperson.

  • Feed barrows

If feed is moved around the farm in barrows, ensure that the barrow is kept out of the rain and is covered at all times. Do not overfill feed barrows as this often leads to spillage of feed whilst moving the barrow around the farm.

  • Wastage associated with medications in the feed

Place medicated feed into the correct bin. Ensure that all feed bins are numbered and the driver places the correct feed in the correct feed bin. This will avoid having to empty a feed bin or having to live with unintended and expensive medication withdrawal times.

  • Palatability

All feed which enters the farm should be tasted by the stockperson in charge of the area and the manager to ensure that feed palatability standards are being met. This should include wet feed ingredients.

Do not allow medication to make the feed unpalatable. If there is any concern regarding palatability, consider the use of talins to mask the taste. Discuss this with your veterinarian if you have any concerns.

Specifically,

  1. Do not store creep feed at high temperatures.
  2. Do not allow feed barrows to waste feed.
  3. Number all feed bins and regularly check.

Feeder setup

  • Adequate feed space

To allow all the pigs to grow evenly, it is essential to provide sufficient feeder space for all the pigs in the pen. This is particularly important in the first three days post-weaning.

Note that the newly weaned pig requires 3x longer feed space than is required a week later. This is because newly weaned pigs feed as a group and do not understand the concept of ad lib feeders.

  • Feed distribution

Ensure that the feed is distributed evenly along a feeder to minimize aggression and fighting at the feed space. This will also minimize uneven growth within a group of pigs. Do not place the feeder on a sloped floor.

  • Feeder in wrong position in the pen

When siting the feeder, consider the ability of the pig to reach it. Feeders placed in cold corners will often become fouled with urine and faeces as the pigs use the area as a toilet. Feeders placed too close to a divider or other obstacle, a drinker for example, may have feed spaces which are inaccessible. Note, pigs should not have to jump up to gain access to the feeder. This is typically seen when young pigs have to cope with raised feeders.

  • Feeders placed so that they cannot be easily examined

All feeders should be placed so that the stockperson can easily examine the feeder for leakage, overflowing of feed, or soiling.

  • Feed and drinker position

Pigs like to drink shortly after feeding. If the drinkers are more than 2 metres from the feeder, pigs will walk between the feeder and drinker and carry food in their mouths. This feed will be dropped (and wasted) on the floor and bedding. Ensure that the pigs do not have to cross the sleeping area to get from the feeder to the drinker.

  • Covering feeders

Uncovered feeders contribute up to 30% of the dust in the air. The feeder is exposed to rodents and possibly birds, which can both eat the feed and soil the remaining feed. All feeders should be covered. If the stockperson needs to examine the feed level, ensure that the feeder has a see-through area where this can be assessed.

Management

  • Use the right feed at the right time

It is essential that pigs progressively move to the cheaper diets as soon as possible, while maximizing their growth potential. Keeping pigs on the expensive early diets for longer than warranted, increases costs. On several farms, the pigs are kept on expensive weaner diets too long to compensate for the poor feed intake and growth in the first week post-weaning. Carry out regular feed budget audits to ensure that the farm is feeding appropriate levels of feed intake.

  • Use correct feed

It is essential to adopt a suitable diet. In times of high prices, it is tempting to simplify and cheapen the feed, but growth and health could be affected. Note if the pig’s growth slows down, this cannot be allowed to affect pig flow and all-in/all-out systems. Poorly formulated diets are more likely to result in diarrhoea, resulting in raw feed ingredients ending up on the floor.

  • Feed preparation

Feed which is incorrectly prepared – ground or rolled, can result in increased waste. Whole grains cannot be digested by the pig and are passed out whole and undigested – and are therefore wasted.

  • Feed available when pigs enter a house

It is essential that pigs are fed the correct diet immediately when they enter the house. Requiring the pigs to eat up the last of the previous group of pigs’ feed is not acceptable. Such feed may contain the incorrect ingredients or medications, or if it has been left for more than a couple of days, has become soiled with moulds, rodent faeces or urine.

Feeding routines

  • Creep feeding in the farrowing house

If the farm practises 3-week weaning, creep feeding needs to be carefully justified. It must be demonstrated that the effort and waste involved in creep feeding enhances weaning weights and post-weaning feed intakes. With 4-week weaning, creep feeding can be beneficial. However, it must be practised so that expensive creep feed is not wasted and soiled. Creep feed should be fed at least 3 times daily – little and often.

  • Adult pig feeding

The feeding routines practised in the farrowing, breeding and gestation areas can result in enormous feed wastage. In the farrowing area, attempting to get the sows to eat too fast can result in loss of appetite in the lactating sow. The pig then fails to clean out the feed trough, resulting in mould development and, in the worst cases, fly infestation of the feed. Note, the feed problems can result in water availability problems affecting milk supply to the piglets.

In the breeding area, when sows are in oestrus they often will not eat and this results in feed remaining in the feed troughs and being wasted.

In gestation areas, feeding routines can be extremely careless, resulting in large amounts of feed being wasted on the floor. Combined with poor cleaning routines, this feed becomes soiled. Overfeeding of the gestating sow is extremely common on pig farms. This extra feed is wasted, does not benefit the growing piglets and reduces subsequent feed intake during lactation.

  • Emptying feeders when pigs leave the farm

Do not dispose of feed remaining in the feeder by pressure washing the feed down the slats. Management of the feeder in the finishing pen is an essential component of finishing.

  • Hospital pen feeders

The feeders in the hospital pen are often over-full and over-running for only one or two pigs. This can result in tremendous wastage. Adjust feed in the hospital pen feeders according to the needs to the pigs.

  • Weekend feeding

It is extremely lazy to overfill feeders – especially in the newly weaned pens, with feed just to avoid having to feed at the weekend. We all want an easy a life, but this laziness can result in wasted and soiled feed.

Feeder management

  • Holes in the feeder

It is imperative that all feeders are examined regularly – at least between batches. Where a feeder is found to have a hole, fix or replace the feeder. Holes that occur over slats cost enormous amounts of money, where chronic feed leakage occurs without trace. Note, holes can occur in down-pipes and feed systems – sometimes out of sight.

  • Feed quantity available

The adjustment of feeders should be made every day. This is one of the most important jobs for grow/finish stockpeople. It is not acceptable that feeders are allowed to over-run just to ensure pigs have “sufficient” feed. Feed efficiency can be maximized when the pigs have to work for their feed. Placing less feed in the feeder by lowering the downpipe into the feeder will reduce feed wastage and dust production, although the feed auger may need to run more often. All stockpeople should understand in detail how the feeder works and how to adjust the feed availability. A feeder, which is over-running, will also tend to allow the feed to become powder. This can result in feed intake refusal, increased dust contamination of the room, limited feed space and increased respiratory problems in the pigs.

Three different feeder designs, all providing too much feed, resulting in feed wastage.

  1. Very powdery feed being fed.
  2. Analysis of the feed in the feed bin – very little powder.
  3. Analysis of the feed in the feeder – a lot of powder, very few pellets.
  • Ignoring over-running feeders

If stockpeople are in too much rush, they may miss a feeder which is over-running. A personal example: the downpipe fell out of the feeder and the auger tried to fill the slurry pit over the weekend. The result: 30 tonnes of wasted feed, as well as the time taken to dig out the slurry pit by a young stockperson – who would never make that mistake again! Obviously, large quantities of feed can be wasted within hours. Feeders and feed systems should be equipped with suitable alarms to prevent this occurrence.

  • Water in the feeder

Any feeder with an additional waterer should receive careful management. Ensure that the water does not leak and fill the feeder, restricting feed access. Likewise, ensure that feed does not build up and limit water availability. Drinkers in feeders should be considered as feed intake enhancers, not as a specific water supply.

Soiling of the feed

  • Feeder incorrectly placed

As discussed above, ensure the feeder does not look like a toilet area to the pig.

Effects of the weather and the feeder

The feed must not be spoiled by the effect of the weather – in particular, during rain storms. This is to include feed barrows and bagged feed areas.

  • Floor feeding/feed as bedding

Floor feeding, for whatever reason, should be avoided. Feed is an extremely expensive bedding material. Whilst it is not uncommon post-weaning to feed on the floor mat, the provision of a simple, inexpensive trough will not only reduce waste, but also provide the stockperson with details of feed consumption per pig, rather than just usage per group.

Particularly surprising is the number of farms where feed is spread on the floor merely to indicate to the pigs where their “sleeping area” is located. Review pen layout and provide a draught-free sleeping area to all pigs.

  • Mouldy feed

The feed can become soiled by water running into a feeder – for example, from a drip cooling system, poorly managed. This wet feed can rapidly become mouldy and fly- infested. Feed bins which are not sealed after filling, or are sited where condensation can occur in the bin, result in feed wastage through mould. Feed bins placed directly in front of outlet fans are an example of this. Mould not only results in wastage, but is a potential health risk if feed is eaten.

  • Farrowing and gestation sows

Adult sows’ feed supplies are particularly prone to soiling through attempts to overfeed by stockpeople.

  • Rodent and vermin control

Birds, mice and rats can consume vast quantities of pig feed. Their faeces and urine contribute to the soiling of even more feed. Feeders should be covered, to reduce access to vermin. Buildings should be bird-proofed to reduce access and thereby improve salmonella control.

FCR has been reduced by 0.3 (3.0 to 2.7 – 30-100 kg liveweight) in sheltered pigs, purely by covering the feeder! In outdoor units, seagulls and birds can swoop down and take several pellets at one time. What is particularly galling is that the sows will often stand to one side while the birds eat!

An adult rat will eat 15g a day – with 1000 rats on a farm, this is nearly 5.5 tonnes per year.

A seagull will eat 100g a day – 100 seagulls eating their ration a day tallies up to 3.7 tonnes of food per year.

Avoid feeding unnecessary animals

  • Non-pregnant sows

It is essential that all sows 6 weeks post-mating are actually pregnant. A sow which is discovered not to be pregnant in week 16 of ‘gestation’ has just consumed 175 kg (2.5x7x10) of feed since mating. On many farms, this can be as many as 7% of sows. On a 250-sow unit, this is accounts for 3 tonnes of sow feed a year.

  • Cull sows

Once the decision to cull a sow is made, ensure that she is culled as soon as possible. Cull sows are eating 2.5 kg a day.

  • Feeding finishing pigs prior to slaughter

To feed a pig immediately prior to slaughter, wastes 2.5 kg per pig sold. In addition, it can make the journey to the slaughterhouse extremely unpleasant for the pigs by inducing vomiting and travel sickness.

  • Overweight finishing pigs

Finishing pigs must be weighed and sold into the slaughterhouse matrix. Outside the box, the pig becomes extremely expensive. When they get to 120kg with a P2 of 16 mm not only are they not going to pay for the extra feed they have consumed, but they are going to result in a penalty at the slaughterhouse, reducing their return.

  • Review culling of runt pigs

Pigs which are born small and/or are weaned as a runt, should have their survivability carefully reviewed. Ninety percent of pigs born below 800g die before reaching slaughter weight. Small, weak born piglets have FCR rate 3.5 to 4.0 instead of 2.4 to 2.6. The feed cost of these animals needs careful review.

  • Sick pigs

Review the pigs in the hospital area. Rectal strictures are not uncommon on pig farms. These pigs will often have ravenous appetites, but they will not be suitable for marketing. In the hospital area, tag all pigs and review after 7 and 14 days post-entry. Cull quickly all pigs that are not going to be marketable.

  • Ileitis and chronic diseases

Ileitis is associated with the bacterium Lawsonia intracellularis. This disease results in chronic feed waste as it increases the thickness of the gut, resulting in less digested feed being absorbed into the pig. This can result in a loss of growth of 40g a day, which, at a FCR of 3, is 120g a day of extra feed eaten.

  • Partial and full de-population?

If the disease problems on the farm become chronic, consider a partial or even full de-population to allow for full cleaning and refurbishment of the farm. A reduction in 0.5 FCR is not uncommon on farms post-partial de-population. Animals that have to live in a heavy pathogen load environment have to divert nutrients from growth to immunological defence, thus wasting feed.

  • Gastric ulcer

In general, gastric ulceration occurs because the pig fails to eat over a 24 hour period. If the feed is very fine (<700 m) the feed will then aggravate an existing gastric ulcer. Gastric ulcers result in feed wastage by poor feed digestion and chronic anaemia. In addition, the pig is weakened and more prone to secondary infections and bullying by other pigs.

Avoid feeding for unnecessary activity

  • Exercise energy: Mis-placed drinkers

It costs feed to have the pigs walk unnecessary distances to the drinkers. In addition, the pigs will carry and drop feed between the drinker and the feeder. Place the feeders no further than 2 metres away from a drinker.

  • Wet bedded areas

If the bedding area is very wet and boggy, the pig will struggle to move around the pen. This can be a particular problem in deep, straw-bedded systems, shelters and hoops, and can add 0.2 FCR onto the feed bill.

  • Air temperature and comfort

Ensure that you keep the pigs within their thermo-comfort zone. If the pigs are housed too cold, feed will be consumed to help keep the pig warm. If the pigs are too hot, feed consumption will drop and therefore growth, but, in addition, extra effort will be expended to pant, to help the pig loose heat. In the farrowing area, feed only at the cooler times of the day.

How much is feed wastage costing you?

The impact of feed wastage

The cost of feed wastage is demonstrated in Table 2.

To survive today’s feed prices, we must minimize feed wastage to minimize cost of production.

nationalhogfarmer.com
06/27/2011

Summer months can trigger heat stress in livestock, especially in pigs, according to Mark Whitney, a swine specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension. Pigs are especially challenged because they lack functional sweat glands to help them efficiently reduce body heat.

Even though the majority of pigs today are raised in modern confinement facilities that provide some climate control, producers still face limits in their ability to cool pigs during extreme heat, he says.

Pigs naturally remove body heat during periods of heat stress through a combination of accelerated respiration, decreased feed intake, increased water consumption and adjustments in physical activity and movement.

Pork producers can minimize heat stress for their pigs by:

  1. Preparing and maintaining cooling systems. Check cooling systems and ensure that thermostats, fans, air inlets, drip coolers, sprinklers, cooling cells and other related equipment are set for summer usage. Use of sprinklers, along with fans, can reduce the temperature in barns provided sprinklers are set correctly. Avoid sprinklers that provide a very fine mist because they will increase humidity levels in the barn. Cooling cells work more effectively to lower humidity levels. Adjust ventilation systems to remove excess moisture from buildings.
  2. Adjusting the feeding program. Since pigs will lower their feed intake during periods of high temperatures, increase the nutritional density of the diet for growing pigs and lactating sows. Adding fat to the hog feeder will also increase the caloric density, but if other nutrient levels are not also increased accordingly, animal performance will still suffer, Whitney says.
  3. Modifying procedures during load-out and transportation of pigs. Transportation is perhaps the most stressful time for pigs during periods of heat. Remove feed from pigs for 12-18 hours before shipment (remove feed but not water). Load fewer pigs in order to allow maximum air movement. Keep vehicles in constant motion and open all vents and slats. Avoid moving pigs during the heat of the day, and allow more time to load pigs. Pigs are apt to become fatigued during hot weather. Additional time and patience are needed to effectively load pigs, while reducing pig and handler stress.

For more educational information, visit extension.umn.edu

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

haybar.co.uk

Hay Bars’ introduction has truly revolutionised a lot of large yards. The initial investment is quickly recouped by reduced waste and reduction in ‘man hours’ spent laboriously filling hay nets.

HayBar pony feeder

Hay and haylage are the recognised feed but now we have even more choice with many different bagged forage products designed to cater for horses with various feeding problems. COPD, laminitics, dental abnormalities and horses with digestive problems all benefit from bagged forage. How to contain these chop like forages is made easier with Hay Bar. The new version Pony Hay Bar is ideal as it is even easier to clean out when feeding these hay replacements.

Feeding from the floor in the natural position is an aid to maintaining clear sinuses and helps to alleviate back and neck problems. Dental abnormalities are seen far less frequently in horses fed from Hay Bars. Both horse and owner benefit from the Hay Bar system, and with the reduced labour costs and reduction in waste of both bedding and forage, make it an investment that more than pays for itself.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

haybar.co.uk

Hay Bars’ natural feeding position has received endorsements from the dental profession. Keith Evans Eq DT “I am convinced that I would see less dental problems in horses I treat if they were fed from the floor by use of the Hay Bar. It is common sense to get the horse to eat in the way that he is designed for. We impact the horses’ environment in so many ways it can only be of benefit to offer him some form of normality in his daily life. ”

HayBar pony feeder

Wayne Abbott B.E.V.A./B.V.D.A. “One of the most important things I advise my clients is that horses benefit significantly from being able to eat at ground level when stabled. In my experience horses that are not fed from nets or racks maintain a far more balanced wear pattern to their teeth enabling them to grind properly and in turn gain full value from their food. The Hay Bar offers a practical solution to being able to provide hay/haylage in their stable and it also helps prevent bedding contamination”

Hay Bar has truly improved the quality of life for horses and owners a like. At this time of year when horses are stabled for most of their day it is important to keep their environment as natural as possible. Hay Bar helps to make this possible and also save on time and waste.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

kirihawkins/themedialords.com

Livestock scales were created for the weighing of large farmyard animals such as horses, sheep, and cattle. These scales are designed to be able to withstand and accurately weigh animals that weigh several tons. Needless to say, that type of weight measurement can not be achieved on standard bathroom scales or even typical veterinary scales which are designed to weigh small and midsized animals such as dogs and cats.

Livestock scales play a large part in the lives of veterinarians who specialize in the health care of farm animals. It is important to have such a scale on hand to readily be able to weigh animals who are perceived to be ill. These scales also play a big role in the upkeep of healthy animals in zoos around the world. You might be amused to know that the same scale used to weigh cows can also be used to weigh crocodiles.

Many times, and probably more often than not, animals who step onto the livestock scales will not stay still for the time that it would take to get an accurate measurement from a traditional scale. Manufacturers of such scales have kept that in mind and design these scales with weight average and hold options that can help to ensure accurate measurements whether the animal is moving about on top of the scale or not. This is essential in making sure that animals are weighed correctly.

Livestock scales are also commonly used on farms where livestock is frequently bought and sold or raised for profit. Needless to say, these types of scales need to be incredibly durable to withstand harsh farm conditions. Most heavy duty livestock scales designed to be used on farms are water resistant to protect them from rain and animal waste. Typically, their sensors are made of durable stainless steel, also a precautionary measure when dealing with animals that can behave in an unpredictable manner.

As you can see, livestock scales can be found in more places than just the veterinarians office. Many farmers would not be able to make due without them.

There are several different types of livestock scales on the market designed for different weight ranges and with different features. All models are typically very durable for their purpose, but some have added features for different weighing situations.

You may be surprised to know that livestock scales aren’t as expensive as some people think, with small scales designed to weigh animals of 700 pounds and lighter starting at around $250. Many scales that weigh animals up to 2,000 pounds cost under $1,000. The price is all dependent upon the manufacturer of the scale and what functionality that you need the scale to perform.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

must check the zero balance of the scale or reweigh a livestock draft when requested by such persons.

Registrants, packers, and the weighers they employ must comply with a request by any authorized P&SP agent to reweigh livestock or livestock carcasses, so P&SP can determine if the weights recorded by the scale are accurate. False weighing is a criminal offense. Legal action may be brought if incorrect weighing is found.

GIPSA (Grain Inspection and Packers and Stockyards Administration (sometimes referred to as P&S) requires Market Agencies (such as Superior Livestock Auction), Dealers (order buyers), Livestock Markets (stockyards, livestock auctions) and Packers to weigh livestock and/or grain on scales that have been tested and certified within six months prior to use. They also require that complete weighing records are maintained and on file. All video/internet auctions, dealers, order buyers, sale barns, packers, grain dealers, et al. are regulated by GIPSA (P&S) and all are required to comply with GIPSA regulations.

Most states also have regulations with regard to scales used for commerce and the majority of the states require that scales be tested and certified annually; however, federal regulations override the state regulations on this issue and failure to comply with the GIPSA regulations can result in the assessment of significant fines. Marketing Agencies, Dealers, Livestock Markets, Packers, etc. have no control over this. All cattle that are weighed must be weighed on scales that have been tested and certified within six months of weighing. Communication with the rancher or seller about the scale issue is critical. If the scale they plan to weigh on is not compliant, a compliant scale should be located, or make arrangements to have it tested and certified prior to the delivery of cattle. Contact other people in the livestock industry in your area and work together to help ranchers, co-ops, truck scales, etc. become compliant with GIPSA regulations. This may require financial assistance on your part, but it may be necessary so as to avoid being assessed with fines and other penalties from GIPSA. This applies to everyone in the industry that weighs livestock or grain for commerce. The following update and clarification on the scale regulation specific to seasonal scales was released recently by GIPSA. The information can be accessed via the web at the following websites:Clarification Statement, Federal Register Notice. Below is the statement from the GIPSA website and following that is the notice from the Federal Register. P&SP’s mission in the area of accurate weights consists of two elements that affect the integrity of livestock and poultry transactions: (1) the accuracy of the scales used for weighing livestock, meat, and poultry, and (2) the proper and honest operation of scales to ensure that the weight on which a transaction is based is accurate. The major emphases in the enforcement of this program are the monitoring of scale tests and the detection of improper and fraudulent use of subject scales. Scale Testing Requirements Stockyard owners, market agencies, dealers (including video auctions), packers, or live poultry dealers that weigh livestock, live poultry, or feed, must have their scales tested at least twice each calendar year (section 201.72(a) (9 CFR 201.72(a)). This requirement for twice a year testing also applies to swine contractors and has been in place in some form since September 24, 1984 (49 FR 37374). On January 20, 2011, GIPSA published a rule (76 FR 3485) to better define scale testing requirements. This new rule specifies that one of the two scale tests must occur between January 1 and June 30 of the calendar year and the second must occur between July 1 and December 31 of the calendar year. A minimum of 120 days is required between these two tests. More frequent testing is required for scales that do not maintain accuracy between tests. Example (for a scale used throughout the year): A scale is tested for the first time in 2011 on April 15, meeting the requirement of a test between January 1 and June 30. The second test needs to be between July 1 and December 31 and more than 120 days after the first test or in this case August 13, 2011. So the second test must occur between August 13 and December 31, 2011. In this new rule, GIPSA has provided an exception for the testing of scales used on a limited seasonal basis, which we have recently clarified A seasonal scale is one used during any continuous 6-month period.

GIPSA requires that seasonal scales be tested once during the calendar year and that the test have been conducted within 6 months prior to its use. Example (seasonal): If a scale is tested on April 15, that test is valid until October 15 and you can use the scale throughout that period. If you want to use the scale after October 15, you would need to have another test conducted and the scale would no longer be considered a seasonal scale for that year.

Instructions for Testing Livestock and Animal Scales Regulations(read more) issued under authority of the P&S Act require that persons weighing livestock and live poultry for purposes of purchase or sale under the P&S Act perform their duties in accordance with official instructions.

Responsibility for Accurate Scales and Livestock Weights, What are the Penalties for Violations under the P&S Act? Administrative and civil penalties for violations of the P&S Act include cease and desist orders, civil penalties not more than $11,000 for each violation, and suspensions of registrations under the P&S Act. Any person found guilty of any of the following criminal offenses against the United States is subject to a fine, imprisonment, or both: Makes false entries in records or accounts; Neglects to make true; correct entries; Mutilates, alters, or falsifies any documentary evidence required to be kept; Refuses to allow inspection of records by
authorized agents.

Weighers, who willfully print or enter a false weight on a scale ticket or other record of a registrant or packer, are subject to the penalties under the P&S Act.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

NORAC, Inc. is pleased to announce that they have acquired Agricultural Scales Inc., a Texas-based scale manufacturing company that has been manufacturing weighing equipment for the agricultural industry for the past six years.

“This purchase, provides an opportunity to increase our distribution system in the southern United States,” said Bill Strelioff, CEO. “As NORAC has historically been strong in the northern states, this is an excellent collaboration. Our distribution is strengthened throughout the country and we are now positioned as the leader in agricultural scales worldwide.”

Matt Crawford, owner and founder of Agricultural Scales Inc, has joined NORAC as the Scale Sales Manager for the United States. “I am very excited about the potential of our new partnership”, said Matt Crawford. “NORAC has a well known unique product that supports the livestock industry.”

NORAC’s leading scale product is the Mobile Group Animal Scale for weighing cattle. The patented design has a low profile weighing platform and a rubberized deck which makes loading and unloading animals quick, easy and safe. Legal-For-Trade accuracy allows the operator to easily move the scale from place to place for weighing anywhere, anytime, accurately.

For over 30 years NORAC has been manufacturing scales. From the introduction of Load Bars to the Mobile Group Animal Scale, NORAC continues to lead the industry in innovation, accuracy and durability.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

gallagher.com.au

With large, easy-to-press buttons, back-lit screens for shed use and the ability to record up to 60,000 animal weights, the latest innovations in weigh-scale technology give farmers and consultants more options than ever before.

Increased farm profitability and user ease are the drivers behind Gallagher’s new generation of weigh-scale technology.

The animal-management system expert has launched a brand new model in the range — the W610. This will be particularly useful in the sheep industry, which is increasingly realising the productivity benefits of electronic tag identification (EID).

The Gallagher-branded range also includes upgraded models of the entry-level weigh scale W210 and W310, plus new W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector, as well as the revolutionary SmartTSi complete livestock management system.

Mike Hemsley, product manager for Gallagher Animal Management Systems, says the new-generation models have resulted from Gallagher’s continual-improvement process.

“We know from research, and simply from what we have out working in paddocks across Australia, that our products are good. Our aim is to make those good products even better in design and usability.”

Flexible W610 has massive memory

Mr Hemsley says the new W610 model is the best entry-level EID weighing system available.

“The W610 can connect to any brand of EID reader and has a massive memory that can store weight readings from 12,000 animals. Additional livestock-management information, such as average daily weight gain and carcase weight, can be calculated and displayed automatically on the two large LCD screens when the animal is weighed.”

The W610 also enables five-way drafting by weight, and includes a full keyboard for manually logging visual IDs.

Back-lit screen, tougher construction

The upgraded W210 and W310, plus new W610 and W810 models, have a tougher construction, larger back-lit screens, raised keyboards and ergonomically operated switches and buttons. Being back-lit, the screens are easy to read in low-light conditions, such as inside a shed.

Mr Hemsley says the W210 has a “clamshell farm-ready toughness”, large buttons for easy selection and a big rotary dial, all of which make it simple to use. It has auto-weight locking or manual-weighing modes and a rechargeable battery.

A step up from the W210, the W310 can sort two ways, and, like the W610 and W810, it shows weighing statistics on screen.

The W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector has even easier data collection than the Ruddweigh 800, which it replaces. On top of the benefits of the W610, it also has internal bluetooth for easier connectivity to electronic readers. The W810 also records the date of every weight measurement and allows the user to enter and edit notes on each recording entry, and can store 21,000 animal IDs and 60,000 weight recordings. It can be set to draft up to nine ways: by EID, list and/or by weight.

SmartTSi

The SmartTSi is Gallagher’s premier animal-management system. Advanced, yet simple-to-use, SmartTSi combines a computer, weigh scale and animal-performance software.

Its intuitive touch-screen ensures that recording and accessing individual animal or herd information is simple and fast, saving farmers time when weighing animals.

Mike Hemsley says SmartTSi models to be released early this year will feature a software upgrade that will also be available to existing SmartTSi users.

“The software upgrade for existing SmartTSi users will be absolutely free. We like users of our technology to have the best tools in their hands.”

Unique full range

Mr Hemsley said the addition of the W610 model to the new-generation range of weigh scales means Gallagher can meet any customer’s needs. All products are backed by a market-leading on-farm sales and support service team.

The range, which was launched on 1 February, sees Gallagher as the only company with a full range of permanent and portable EID readers, software, loadbars, weigh scales and tags.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.