Posts Tagged ‘bulk feed bins’

ker.com

Ask twenty equine enthusiasts what you should feed your horse, and you are likely to hear twenty different answers. Advice will probably include a number of things that you absolutely must do, as well as an equal number of practices to avoid at all costs. What makes this question so complicated? Possibly the confusion results from the fact that virtually every type of grain has positive and negative qualities. When this fact is combined with the vast body of “old-timer” wisdom, advertising hype, and well-meaning advice encountered by the average horse owner, it is not difficult to see why simple answers seem so elusive. An examination of the pros and cons of various feed ingredients may be the best place to start.

OATS ARE GOOD. This traditional horse feed is palatable and easy to chew. Oats are less susceptible to mold than corn or wheat. Unprocessed oats retain their quality when properly stored. They are considered a “safe” grain because starch from processed or unprocessed oats is readily digested in the small intestine.

OATS ARE BAD. Because they do not offer all the nutrients necessary for growth and maintenance of body tissues, oats cannot be considered a complete feed. When an extra can of oats is mixed with a scoop of a fortified feed, nutrient balance is compromised. Oats contain a high proportion of indigestible fiber (up to 35% by weight). Processed oats have a very short shelf life.

CORN IS GOOD. Corn is also a traditional feed for equines, and most horses like the taste. Corn is high in starch (70%).

CORN IS BAD. Corn is low in protein, with a lysine level of only about 0.25%. Fed at high levels, corn may not be completely digested in the small intestine, and undigested starch passing to the large intestine can trigger colic or laminitis. Corn that is harvested or stored at high moisture levels may harbor mold, especially on broken or damaged kernels.

BARLEY IS GOOD. Barley provides high energy, moderate protein, and low fiber. In regions where barley is grown it is sometimes substituted for corn in horse rations. Crude protein from barley is digested more easily than corn protein. Net energy available from barley is higher than oats.

BARLEY IS BAD. Barley starch has somewhat low digestibility in the small intestine. Rolling improves this factor, and feeding micronized barley results in the least undigested starch reaching the large intestine. This grain is somewhat low in lysine and methionine. Improper storage can lower the quality of barley due to growth of to fungus or mold.

MOLASSES IS GOOD. Molasses holds top-dressed supplements and fine particles, and its excellent palatability encourages picky eaters.

MOLASSES IS BAD. Its high sugar content may trigger a high glycemic response followed by a slump in energy.

SWEET FEED IS GOOD. Sweet feed is palatable to most horses. The molasses in sweet feed discourages “sorting” of ingredients and top-dressed supplements. It may be somewhat easier to detect moldy or rancid sweet feed because of changes in appearance, smell, and texture, whereas these changes are not as evident in pelleted feeds.

SWEET FEED IS BAD. Its sticky texture can cause bridging or clumping in feed mill containers or storage bins. Mold can grow in sweet feed that sticks to the side of the container, contaminating fresh feed. Bulk feed bins and storage units should be emptied and cleaned regularly, especially in hot weather.

7 ft x 2 row basic bulk feeder bin with 16" collar for poly hopper and with ground control cap opener. To see our complete line of bulk feed bins visit our Website, barnworld.com.

PELLETS ARE GOOD. Because every pellet contains all ingredients in the mix, pelleting is a way to guarantee that the horse cannot pick through the feed and eat only the most appetizing morsels. Heat during processing slightly increases digestibility of ingredients. Pelleted feeds are usually not subject to clumping in production lines or storage units. Containers and feed tubs stay cleaner and are less attractive to flies and rodents. While the comment “You can’t ever tell what’s in pellets” is still heard on occasion, the tag provides an ingredient list and a guaranteed analysis, giving an assurance that quality ingredients have been used to make the feed.

PELLETS ARE BAD. Top-dressed supplements and additives tend to sift through pellets and be left in the bottom of the feed tub. Fine particles may aggravate allergies in susceptible horses, and an extremely high level of fines means less useable feed per bag or batch. Getting the mix too hot or keeping it at a high temperature too long during processing can compromise vitamin content and protein digestibility.

FAT IS GOOD. Measured by volume, fat contributes more energy than grains. There is less chance of founder or colic than with feeds providing energy from starch. Fat delivers “cool” energy and is a good fuel for endurance exercise.

FAT IS BAD. It is not a complete feed and should make up no more than about 20% of the horse’s diet. In large quantities, fat can cause diarrhea. Some types of animal fat decrease feed palatability.

It’s clear that there are good and bad features of almost anything that can be fed to a horse, but owners don’t need to worry about sorting through all the confusion. Equine nutritionists have taken most of the guesswork out of feeding and have provided carefully formulated products to complement forage in almost any nutrition program. A simple answer to the feeding dilemma does exist:

  • Base a feeding program on high-quality forage (grass or hay).
  • Provide energy and necessary nutrients by using a fortified grain product chosen on the basis of the horse’s age, use, size, and body type. KER has formulated feeds to meet the needs of horses in all riding disciplines and stages of life.
  • Adjust the feeding program as dictated by changes in body weight, performance demands, or reproductive status.

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For more information about cattle guards, cattle scales, and saddle pads, please visit our Barn World informational site.

For more information about hog feeders, grain weight conversion, and hay feeders, please visit our Barn World informational site.

For more information about livestock scales, bulk feed bins, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit our Barn World informational site.

omafra.gov.on.ca

When grain is loaded into storage it is at its peak quality. Over time, the quality of the grain will only decrease; it seldom, if ever, improves. The following strategies will help maintain the quality of your grain at the same level as when it went into the bin.

Good Bin Management Suggestions

  • Treat empty bins to control any stored grain pests that may be living in cracks, crevices and below the aeration floor.
  • Clean any grain going into a bin.
  • Remove fines and other foreign material to reduce air flow restrictions and possibly reduce the risk of spoilage.
  • Core a bin (augur out some grain) after filling to establish the flow funnel and redistribute the fines, even if the removed material is put back into the same bin.
  • Install a manometer in the air plenum below the aeration floor to monitor the static pressure of the air moved by the fan. For information on how to build a manometer, see Figure 11-1, Home-Built Manometer.
  • Use the measured static pressure and the fan performance curve to determine the air flow delivered by the fan.
  • Tightly cover unused aeration fan inlets to prevent unintentional air movement through the grain.

Why Aerate Grain in Bins

Grain bin aeration:

  • Removes field heat at the time of harvest or cools grain from a dryer
  • Brings the whole mass to a uniform temperature
  • Removes moisture that has respired from the stored grain as a result of temperature changes caused by the outside air

As bin surfaces are warmed or cooled by the sun or outside air, air currents start to move by convection in the grain mass. Moisture from the grain is carried by these convective air cells and condenses on colder surfaces. These colder areas may be inner bin surfaces or the grain itself. Spoilage can occur if this convective air movement is not arrested. Routine aeration of the bin contents will prevent convective air movement.

Maintain a temperature differential of no more than 5°C between the grain mass and the average outside air temperature to prevent convective air movement from occurring.

Table 11-1. Time Required for Aeration Front to Move Through Grain

Basics of Aeration

  • Bring the whole grain mass to the same temperature.
  • Operate the fan only when relative humidity levels will not add moisture to the grain.
  • Operate the fan for long enough to totally change the whole grain mass temperature – this may require a number of days. The time required for this will depend on the airflow rate per bushel.
  • Become familiar with Equilibrium Moisture Content charts for the grain or beans you are storing (see the section Harvest and Storage in each commodity chapter). Run the fan only under outside conditions that will not add moisture to the stored product. Relative humidity levels of night-time air can add moisture to small grains, beans and natural air dried corn.
  • See Table 11-1, Time Required for Aeration Front to Move Through Grain, for the aeration time required to completely change the bin content temperature.

Grain Storage Monitoring

Monitor all bins of grain stored on the farm on a routine schedule.

Stored grain that is used regularly for feed can be monitored as it is being used. Set up a routine for checking the bins of grains that are not being used regularly. Grain can go out of condition quickly. By carefully and diligently monitoring storage bins, growers will be able to detect the warning signs of possible spoilage problems and be able to take appropriate action to prevent further reductions in quality.

Bulk feeder bin with hopper valve (side mount). Get your at barnworld.com.

Monthly Bin Monitoring Checklist

  • Turn on the aeration fan.
  • Climb up and look inside the bin. Look for signs of moisture on the underside of the roof. If water droplets or ice are present, aerate the bin. Moisture from the grain has been carried into the attic space and condensed on the roof metal.
  • Run the aeration fan if a light dusting of snow has been driven into the top of a storage bin. It will sublimate and be discharged as harmless water vapour. If much greater amounts of snow are found, shovel it out.
  • Check for any off-odours. The air should smell like clean grain.
  • Check the grain surface to see if it looks the same as the last time. If it looks dull or off-colour, investigate further.
  • Check for changes in the static pressure or the working pressure of the fan in the plenum under the aeration floor since the previous month. A decrease is no cause for concern. An increase, however, indicates that something has increased the resistance of the air as it moves through the grain mass. Investigate deeper into the grain mass.
  • Look for any signs of insect activity.
  • Record your notes in a monitoring logbook for comparison with the next month’s readings.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

agrinewsinteractive.com

This plan gives details for making single or multiple bulk feed bins. The principle use is for holding a variety of ration ingredients above a feed-processing center. The individual bins are made square, in multiples of 610 or 1220 mm (2 or 4 ft) for economical cutting from standard plywood sheets.

The bins may be clustered together in various arrangements as long as the two basic square sizes are used.

Make the waif and hopper bottoms from ‘exterior sheathing’ grade plywood, either Douglas fir or spruce, but be careful ‘to adhere to the maximum bin depths specified for each thickness and type of plywood. Use plywood with tongue-and-groove edges to solve the problem of making the horizontal joints dust-tight.

The corner joints are connected by steel straps and angles bolted together through the plywood. The outside corner angles extend below the vertical bin walls to make support legs; these must be cross-tied with steel rods, welded in place to keep the legs from buckling.

6 feet x 1 Row Basic Bulk Bin with 16" collar for poly hopper and with ground control cap opener, available at barnworld.com.

Storage Capacity

Each 1220 mm square bulk feed bin, including the two-sloped 60° hopper, holds 4.25 m3 (150 ft3). For example a four-bin 2.4 m (8 ft) square unit holds up to 17 m3 (600 ft3), equivalent to 14.3 t (31400 lb) of wheat. Where the four corner legs bear on the beams and columns of a floor system, make very sure the floor is made safe for this full load.

Storage capacity of each 610 mm (2 ft) square bin, including hopper, is 0.98 m3 (34 ft3).

Suggestions for Building

A typical four-bin group totaling 2.4 m square requires over 800 stove bolts and over 600 drilled holes to fasten the corners. To do this work efficiently requires careful pre-planning.

Predrill the bolt holes through half of the steel angles on a shop drill-press. Then clamp the plywood and both steel angles together before drilling the plywood and the other half of the angles. This is the surest way to make bolt holes in perfect alignment. Use a two person team; one outside to drill the holes, start the nuts and hold them, another inside to insert the bolts and turn them tight with a power screwdriver.

First assemble the vertical wall panels, the steel corner angles and the vertical plywood hopper dividers. Then measure and double-check the in-place dimensions of the sloping hopper panels before cutting them from plywood stock. Install the sloping hopper panels last. Up to this point the inside worker can work from a stepladder standing on the floor.

Note that all plywood panels must run with the face grains horizontal.

Bottom

  • Slide-valves

In many cases a shut-off valve is required to control feed flow from an overhead bin hopper to a feedmill or truck below. With a full head of grain or ground feed in the bin, extra leverage may be required to operate the valve.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

by Eleanor Richards | learningabouthorses.com

Horse owners are discovering a trip to the feed store requires an armed guard.

But once the edible “gold” is safely transported to the stable, how is it protected and stored?

As with anything of value, the chances of it being stolen is very high. In this case the thieves are usually horses and rodents.

Commercial feeds, grain and supplements must be stored in a secure location. A room, such as an extra stall, with a locking door is best. Within that room, storage containers with lids that can be locked or fastened securely should be provided. This double protection helps insure the thief will have trouble accessing the treasure.

Several types of containers are available. An old chest freezer with the latch removed (to insure a child does not become trapped) works well. Other popular containers are trash cans. Galvanized metal trash cans work best, as the steel also deters the other thieves – rodents (rats and mice).

Secure containers will also help prevent Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis. Opossums, skunks and raccoons may have the organism which causes EPM in their feces. Horses may acquire EPM when they ingest grain, forage or water contaminated with the feces.

Regardless of the type of container you choose the lid must fasten securely and be hard for a horse to remove. There is always a chance the feed room door will be left open. Bungee cords may help secure the lid.

Extra bags of feed that will not fit in the secure containers may be stacked on a platform a few inches above the ground. A wooden pallet works well. This allows air circulation around the bags. It is imperative the feed room be securely closed at all times if exposed feed bags are stored.

Feed should be purchased fresh every 30 days and rotated. This means the containers should be cleaned completely and the oldest feed used first.

High humidity can cause spoilage and increase the chances of insects. Even feed stored in containers is susceptible to moisture. If the containers are sweating or show signs of condensation, it is possible the feed will spoil or become contaminated with insects. Insuring proper ventilation and setting up a fan will help. During the summer, when nights are cool and the days are hot and humid, purchasing and storing less feed at one time is smart.

Stables with 20 or more horses may consider buying bulk feed bins. While this can be cost effective, you still do not want to store more than a month’s supply at a time.

Clean the bulk feed bin out completely before refilling. Poorly constructed bulk bins allow the buildup of moisture resulting in spoiled feed. This spoiled feed can hang-up on the sides and may break loose at any time – contaminating the feed and causing sick horses.

Bulk feed bins, available at barnworld.com.

No matter what type of storage you chose the area must be kept clean. Spilled feed and broken bags will attract unwanted guests.

When buying anything of value, make sure you are buying quality. The feed should not be more than a month old.

Do not be shy at the feed store…you are the customer. Check the date and refuse it if it is old or does not meet your expectations. Refuse dirty or damaged bags.

Date of manufacturing will be stated on the feed tag, stamped on the bag, or printed on the tear strip along one end of the bag. Many companies use the Julian Date Calendar. For example the date code may read: 08121. The “08” is the year – 2008; the “121” is the 121st day of the year – May 1st.

Even if the date of manufacture meets your requirements refuse or return the feed if it seems questionable.

Horses can be their own worst enemy. It is up to us to protect them from temptation.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

nationalhogfarmer.com
06/27/2011

Summer months can trigger heat stress in livestock, especially in pigs, according to Mark Whitney, a swine specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension. Pigs are especially challenged because they lack functional sweat glands to help them efficiently reduce body heat.

Even though the majority of pigs today are raised in modern confinement facilities that provide some climate control, producers still face limits in their ability to cool pigs during extreme heat, he says.

Pigs naturally remove body heat during periods of heat stress through a combination of accelerated respiration, decreased feed intake, increased water consumption and adjustments in physical activity and movement.

Pork producers can minimize heat stress for their pigs by:

  1. Preparing and maintaining cooling systems. Check cooling systems and ensure that thermostats, fans, air inlets, drip coolers, sprinklers, cooling cells and other related equipment are set for summer usage. Use of sprinklers, along with fans, can reduce the temperature in barns provided sprinklers are set correctly. Avoid sprinklers that provide a very fine mist because they will increase humidity levels in the barn. Cooling cells work more effectively to lower humidity levels. Adjust ventilation systems to remove excess moisture from buildings.
  2. Adjusting the feeding program. Since pigs will lower their feed intake during periods of high temperatures, increase the nutritional density of the diet for growing pigs and lactating sows. Adding fat to the hog feeder will also increase the caloric density, but if other nutrient levels are not also increased accordingly, animal performance will still suffer, Whitney says.
  3. Modifying procedures during load-out and transportation of pigs. Transportation is perhaps the most stressful time for pigs during periods of heat. Remove feed from pigs for 12-18 hours before shipment (remove feed but not water). Load fewer pigs in order to allow maximum air movement. Keep vehicles in constant motion and open all vents and slats. Avoid moving pigs during the heat of the day, and allow more time to load pigs. Pigs are apt to become fatigued during hot weather. Additional time and patience are needed to effectively load pigs, while reducing pig and handler stress.

For more educational information, visit extension.umn.edu

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

NORAC, Inc. is pleased to announce that they have acquired Agricultural Scales Inc., a Texas-based scale manufacturing company that has been manufacturing weighing equipment for the agricultural industry for the past six years.

“This purchase, provides an opportunity to increase our distribution system in the southern United States,” said Bill Strelioff, CEO. “As NORAC has historically been strong in the northern states, this is an excellent collaboration. Our distribution is strengthened throughout the country and we are now positioned as the leader in agricultural scales worldwide.”

Matt Crawford, owner and founder of Agricultural Scales Inc, has joined NORAC as the Scale Sales Manager for the United States. “I am very excited about the potential of our new partnership”, said Matt Crawford. “NORAC has a well known unique product that supports the livestock industry.”

NORAC’s leading scale product is the Mobile Group Animal Scale for weighing cattle. The patented design has a low profile weighing platform and a rubberized deck which makes loading and unloading animals quick, easy and safe. Legal-For-Trade accuracy allows the operator to easily move the scale from place to place for weighing anywhere, anytime, accurately.

For over 30 years NORAC has been manufacturing scales. From the introduction of Load Bars to the Mobile Group Animal Scale, NORAC continues to lead the industry in innovation, accuracy and durability.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

gallagher.com.au

With large, easy-to-press buttons, back-lit screens for shed use and the ability to record up to 60,000 animal weights, the latest innovations in weigh-scale technology give farmers and consultants more options than ever before.

Increased farm profitability and user ease are the drivers behind Gallagher’s new generation of weigh-scale technology.

The animal-management system expert has launched a brand new model in the range — the W610. This will be particularly useful in the sheep industry, which is increasingly realising the productivity benefits of electronic tag identification (EID).

The Gallagher-branded range also includes upgraded models of the entry-level weigh scale W210 and W310, plus new W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector, as well as the revolutionary SmartTSi complete livestock management system.

Mike Hemsley, product manager for Gallagher Animal Management Systems, says the new-generation models have resulted from Gallagher’s continual-improvement process.

“We know from research, and simply from what we have out working in paddocks across Australia, that our products are good. Our aim is to make those good products even better in design and usability.”

Flexible W610 has massive memory

Mr Hemsley says the new W610 model is the best entry-level EID weighing system available.

“The W610 can connect to any brand of EID reader and has a massive memory that can store weight readings from 12,000 animals. Additional livestock-management information, such as average daily weight gain and carcase weight, can be calculated and displayed automatically on the two large LCD screens when the animal is weighed.”

The W610 also enables five-way drafting by weight, and includes a full keyboard for manually logging visual IDs.

Back-lit screen, tougher construction

The upgraded W210 and W310, plus new W610 and W810 models, have a tougher construction, larger back-lit screens, raised keyboards and ergonomically operated switches and buttons. Being back-lit, the screens are easy to read in low-light conditions, such as inside a shed.

Mr Hemsley says the W210 has a “clamshell farm-ready toughness”, large buttons for easy selection and a big rotary dial, all of which make it simple to use. It has auto-weight locking or manual-weighing modes and a rechargeable battery.

A step up from the W210, the W310 can sort two ways, and, like the W610 and W810, it shows weighing statistics on screen.

The W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector has even easier data collection than the Ruddweigh 800, which it replaces. On top of the benefits of the W610, it also has internal bluetooth for easier connectivity to electronic readers. The W810 also records the date of every weight measurement and allows the user to enter and edit notes on each recording entry, and can store 21,000 animal IDs and 60,000 weight recordings. It can be set to draft up to nine ways: by EID, list and/or by weight.

SmartTSi

The SmartTSi is Gallagher’s premier animal-management system. Advanced, yet simple-to-use, SmartTSi combines a computer, weigh scale and animal-performance software.

Its intuitive touch-screen ensures that recording and accessing individual animal or herd information is simple and fast, saving farmers time when weighing animals.

Mike Hemsley says SmartTSi models to be released early this year will feature a software upgrade that will also be available to existing SmartTSi users.

“The software upgrade for existing SmartTSi users will be absolutely free. We like users of our technology to have the best tools in their hands.”

Unique full range

Mr Hemsley said the addition of the W610 model to the new-generation range of weigh scales means Gallagher can meet any customer’s needs. All products are backed by a market-leading on-farm sales and support service team.

The range, which was launched on 1 February, sees Gallagher as the only company with a full range of permanent and portable EID readers, software, loadbars, weigh scales and tags.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

The Readers of National Hog Farmer are again looking forward to the “2011 New Product Tour” Issues. Now is your chance to put focus on products/services introduced to the industry in the past year.

Over 20,000 engaged pork producers will learn more about the features and benefits that make your new product valuable.

2010 World Pork Expo New Product Showcase
Shines Spotlight on Most Promising New Products
Pork industry innovators have been busy coming up with a variety of new products to help producers save money and improve efficiency this year. National Hog Farmer is pleased to offer our readers and World Pork Expo attendees an opportunity to learn more about new products and services recently introduced to the pork industry.

A panel of pork industry experts will be taking a close look at the new products on behalf of our pork producer readers. And you can join the review process too. Come visit the National Hog Farmerbooth #623 in the Varied Industries Building at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines during World Pork Expo and cast your vote for the most promising new product. When you cast your vote, you are automatically entered in a daily prize drawing.

New Product Tour Nominees

In the meantime, go ahead and get a head start on the new product tour by taking a look at the new product nominations featured below. National Hog Farmer’s New Product Review Panel will share their thoughts in a special feature in the July 15 issue. And the votes cast by World Pork Expo attendees will select the “producer’s choice” new product.

SmartIR Feed Sensor
AP’s SmartIR Feed System Sensor controls all functions of a feed delivery system by using six infrared beams to detect the presence of feed. The system is not affected by changes in temperature, humidity or feed type and does not require any sensitivity adjustments. An alarm can provide notification if an out-of-feed event is occurring. The large digital display and system status LEDs are designed for easy reading. SmartIR can be adapted to nearly all new or existing feed systems.

Learn more at
www.automatedproduction.com
Call 217-226-4449 or
email apsales@automatedproduction.com.
Visit Booth No. 179 VIB


Sepcom Manure Solids Separator
Agpro introduces the Sepcom screw press-type manure solids separator to the U.S. market. The separator features a steel-reinforced polymer screw and a quick-replace, wedge wire screen. A patented outlet orifice plate requires no weights or cylinders. The use of a polymer screw against a stainless steel screen significantly extends component life and lowers maintenance challenges. Varying pitch screw and screen openings helps contribute to the ultimate in solids removal. The Sepcom Manure Solids Separator has been in use for over three years in Europe.

Learn more at
www.agprousa.com
Call 800-527-1030 or
email agpro@neto.com
Visit Booth No. 676 VIB


New Pig Plus Combination Tag
Allflex has developed an identification tag combination to help aid in easy identification as the pig grows. The new Piglet tag male is combined with the softer, more pliable Pig+ female, which is placed on the inner side of the ear. The Pig+ female panel tag allows for deep or higher application on the small ear and allows for free rotation of the two tags. The all-plastic Piglet male tag is placed on the outside of the ear and can stand up in the environment. Both pieces can be custom laser-marked at an economical price.

Learn more at
www.allflexusa.com
Call 515-708-6804 or
email pflint@allflexusa.com
Visit Booth No. 366 VIB


Sure Drop
The Sure Drop from Improved Solutions, Inc. is a new device designed to work with existing release devices on the market to open sidewall curtains to help protect pigs during overheating and power-failure events. A unique design allows the lock handle to drop, eliminating the need for a hand winch to unwind. The Sure-Drop includes a mounting panel with two fixed pulleys, the cable release device, and the moveable pulley pre-mounted on the panel. The panel is configured to work as either a left- or right-hand device.

Call 618-895-1318 or
email suredrop1@gmail.com
Visit Booth No. 607 VIB


First Step™ Feed
First Step Creep Feed helps create “eaters” prior to weaning. Designed for baby pigs from 14-25 days of age, First Step uses a unique form, proprietary palatants and specialty ingredients in order to optimize feed intake while supporting the developing immune and digestive systems. Research shows creating eaters pre-weaning helps optimize post-weaning gain.

Learn more at
www.UltraCareFeed.com
Visit Booth No. 356 – 360 VIB


Swinewater Manure Treatment System
Livestock Water Recycling has developed a pre-manufactured Manure Treatment System designed to be placed directly at the swine production site. Installation of the system eliminates the need for a manure storage lagoon. The end products of the Manure Treatment System include clean, re-usable water, dry solids and concentrated, nutrient-rich fertilizer.

Learn more at
www.livestockwaterrecycling.com
Call 403-203-4972 or
email karen.schuett@livestockwaterrecycling.com
Visit Booth No. CB 2902 at World Pork Expo Outdoor


Mi-T-M CWC-3005 Pressure Washer
The Mi-T-M CWC cold water pressure washer offers an abundance of pressure in a compact, user-friendly unit. A new, narrow roll-cage frame design will fit through any 30-in. door and provides a center eye lifting hook. This belt-drive unit features a heavy duty, low rpm, 5-gpm pump and industrial TEFC 10-hp. motor, producing 3000 psi of cleaning power. The unit rolls easily on four wheels.

Learn more at
www.washersystems.com
Call 800-433-8441 or
email wsoiegli@mchsi.com
Visit Booth No. 4012 OA


Swine Management Tool Series (SMTS)
The Swine Management Tool Series (SMTS) is a suite of software comprised of ten, fully integrated modules. The software offers farm-to-fork information traceability, wireless remote data capture solutions and superior web-designed reporting. From wean to harvest, every segment of information related to the swine live-production cycle, including technical field service data and group accounting data, can be tracked and analyzed. Planning modules allow users to forecast future market fluctuations and plan for production changes.

Learn more at
www.Mtech-Systems.com
Call 678-990-2345 or
email sales@mtech-systems.com
Visit Booth No. 553 VIB


ParaSail®
Newport Laboratories offers ParaSail®, the swine industry’s first avirulent live, single-dose vaccine for Haemophilus parasuis. Available exclusively through veterinarians, ParaSail has been proven to protect against three of the most predominant strains of H. parasuis currently circulating including serotype 4, serotype 5, and serotype 13. The USDA has approved ParaSail for use as a single-dose product with a 1- ml. intramuscular dose size for pigs aged 21 days or older.

Learn more at
www.parasailprotection.com
Call 800-220-2522 ext. 3030 or
email info@parasailprotection.com
Visit Booth No. 152 VIB


NORSVIN® LY – The Full Program
Norsvin USA introduces the NORSVIN® LY Full Program F1 breeding gilt. This parent female combines traits of the NORSVIN® Landrace with NORSVIN® Yorkshire resulting in the first NORSVIN® LYfemales for U.S. producers. Norsvin genetics provide superior productivity in both total pigs born and total weaned while achieving excellent weaning weights. Norsvin breeding stock balances outstanding structure and underlines with feed efficiency, growth and carcass quality, contributing to top market hog performance.

Learn more at
www.norsvinusa.com
Call 507-259-7604 or
email dale.hover@norsvinusa.com
Visit Booth No. 628 VIB


MaxKlor
Preserve International’s new stabilized chlorine dioxide product, MaxKlor, is a great step in water treatment for pork producers. MaxKlor is EPA registered to inactivate bacteria, viruses, protozoa and algae in watering systems for animals, and is also approved for drinking water for pigs and humans. It oxidizes minerals like iron and manganese for removal through filtration. Disinfect traditional pathogens like fecal coliform and E. Coli without creating resistance, while also killing newer, more resilient pathogens.

Learn more at
www.preserveinternational.com
Call 800-995-1607 or
email stuartheller@bellsouth.net
Visit Booth No. 506 VIB


Life Savior

SEC Repro, Inc. offers the Life Savior to help prevent piglet crushing in the farrowing crate up to six days after birth. A sensor on the Life Savior unit triggers a blower to send a stream of air between the sow’s legs when she sits, stands or moves. Piglets move out of the danger zone when hit by the air stream. The washable Life Savior can be installed in the piglet “comfort zone” with most farrowing crates.

Learn more at
www.secrepro.com
Call 450-776-0596 or
email louis@secrepro.com
Visit Booth No. 633 VIB


Sector Probe Extension

The Sector Probe Extension from SEC Repro, Inc. helps improve safety while protecting the ultrasound probe during pregnancy checking by allowing sows to be scanned from outside of the gestation crate. A 15-in. hollow, molded plastic pipe allows the Agroscan probe to be inserted inside of the crate. The Sector Probe Extension allows the user the flexibility to pregnancy check sows on either the left or right side.

Learn more at
www.secrepro.com
Call 450-776-0596 or
email louis@secrepro.com
Visit Booth No. 633 VIB


National Swine Nutrition Guide
The 2010 National Swine Nutrition Guide (NSNG) is a practical publication containing 35 nutrition Factsheets with nutrient recommendations and feeding guidelines. The NSNG also comes complete with a booklet containing nutrient recommendation tables from the Factsheets, and a Diet Formulation and Evaluation CD. Producers can use the CD to formulate swine diets on a least-cost basis and to evaluate the nutritional adequacy of existing diets for sows, boars, nursery pigs, growing and finishing pigs, replacement gilts and boars.

Learn more at
www.usporkcenter.org
Call 515-294-7556 or
email drdave@iastate.edu
Visit Booth No. 150 VIB


VivaSound 16/128 Echograph
UNGAVA is introducing the portable VivaSound 16/128 Echograph to the veterinary market. The compact, battery-operated hand-held unit features a 100% digital beamformer to help provide crisp images. Its aluminum and rubber casing makes it extremely durable for daily operation under farm conditions. The unit is designed for easy connection to a personal computer. The product is also ready for real-time in vivo Intramuscular Fat (IMF) readings.

Learn more at
www.ungava-tech.com
Call +1-418-266-1077 or
email info@ungava-tech.com
Visit Booth No. 261 VIB


Ventra PRO Controller
The new and expanded Ventra PRO Controller from VAL-CO™ incorporates a hardware redesign for better field serviceability by including plug-in relays, wire rerouting for reduced electrical interference and allowing easier wiring via plug-in terminals. A software redesign offers expanded capability for tracking propane usage and providing the ability to store multiple programs on an SD card. The Ventra PRO Controller provides one-touch access to pertinent information such as daily high/low temperatures, water usage, feeder run times, etc., all in one simple menu at the touch of a button.

Learn more at
www.valcompanies.com
Call 717-354-4586 ext. 451 or
email sales@valcompanies.com
Visit Booth No. 637 VIB


PICS
PICS is an inventory control tool that helps producers save time and money by minimizing inventory shrink. Producers can receive product into the inventory, check product out to the field, add products to a simple, online ordering site and make adjustments to inventory with reason codes. The PICS has the ability to track product usage by receiving empty containers/bottles back in from the field. A handheld scanner is provided along with bar codes and necessary labels.

Learn more at
www.walcointl.com
Call 817-859-3415 or
email whitem@walcointl.com
Visit Booth No. 522 VIB


Low Stress Pig Handling for Truckers Online Training Course
The online training course, “Low Stress Pig Handling for Truckers” uses real-life video depicting the process of loading and unloading pot-bellied semi trailers as a teaching tool to help truckers learn about practical pig-handling skills. This training is designed to help truckers move stock more easily while maintaining the value of the animals being transported. Poor animal handling can cost pork producers millions of dollars every year through death, trim and meat-quality losses.

Learn more at
www.dnlfarmstraining.com
Call 306-276-5761 or
email dnlfarms@xplornet.com
Visit Booth No. 3018 CB


Key Dollar Separators
Key Dollar separators use two ½ hp. motors, are self-cleaning and use their own water, no fresh water is required. The separators hold up well and can produce water for pigs from the waste water with a little help and treatment. A standard roll press is used for composting or bedding. Five models are available to fit producer needs.

Learn more at
www.keydollar.com
Call 509-386-1220 o
email key_dollar@hotmail.com
Visit Booth No. 4317 OA

NEW PRODUCT NOMINATION FORM

World Pork Expo New Product Tour
Nomination Form

Cost of Entry: $750
Deadline for entries: April 8, 2011

Nominate your new product for the 2011 New Product Tour and take advantage of this special offer to increase your exposure:
• Place an ad on Pork Industry Express at half price – your cost: $150; valued at: $300
• National Hog Farmer TV – Supply a video to National Hog Farmer and we will post it on our Web site for one month, your cost: $200
Call for questions: 952-851-4605 or debbie.weinhold@penton.com

1. Company Name
2. Company Address
3. City
4. State
5. Zip code
6. Company Phone
7. Booth Number
8. Web site address
9. Trade name of product
10. Name and phone number of contact person
12. Email
13. Phone

14. Attach separately…a brief description of the product including why it is important to pork producers. You may include a sales brochure, copy of an ad and photos. Send 6 copies of the entry form, product description, photo and any other material to:

Debbie Weinhold
NATIONAL HOG FARMER
7900 International Drive, Suite 300
Minneapolis, MN 55425
952-851-4605

Or, send your nomination form, product description and hi-res images electronically to: debbie.weinhold@penton.com

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

nationalhogfarmer.com

Dec 30, 2009 12:47 PM

A new Iowa State University (ISU) Extension publication can help farmers track their energy use and compare their usage and costs for various energy sources. “Tracking the Energy Use on Your Farm” is available to download from the Extension Online Store.

The publication includes an energy log that can be downloaded for use with Microsoft Excel or printed and completed by hand, says Jane Flammang, ISU Extension program coordinator for the new statewide Farm Energy Conservation and Efficiency educational initiative. Farmers can use the log to track total on-farm energy use, including electricity, diesel fuel, gasoline, propane or natural gas. The Excel spreadsheet will automatically calculate a farmer’s per-unit cost and the total energy cost month to month throughout the year.

This publication is part of a series of materials designed to increase farmer awareness of methods to improve efficient use of energy and help them explore alternatives to reduce farm energy demand and improve overall profitability.

The ISU effort is made possible by a grant from the Iowa Energy Center.

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

chicagotribune.com / By Janet Mendel, Special to the Los Angeles Times

Reporting from Jabugo, Andalusia, Spain — Walking into the central plaza of the small town of Jabugo, you breathe in the aroma of ibérico ham, a sweet-nutty smell so intense it’s as if it emanates from the very walls of the houses. This is the source — where ibérico pigs roam through forests of wild oak and scrabble for acorns and where their meat is converted into what many have declared the best ham in the world.

Jabugo, a town nestled in the Sierra de Aracena in southwestern Andalusia, is a name with almost mythic meaning, far out of proportion to the town’s size. That’s because Jabugo is synonymous with great ham. In a region where every little town seems to have a few butcher shops selling ibérico ham, those from Jabugo stand out. And for the first time, that ham will be available in the United States before the end of the year.

The town is famous for its hams primarily because of the Sánchez Romero Carvajal company, established there in 1879 and now owned by the multinational Osborne Group, makers of fine sherry. The company’s hams with the 5J or “Cinco Jotas” label will be available in the United States. The first to arrive probably will be paletas, or shoulder hams from the front legs, because they require a shorter curing period than hams from the rear legs. Regular hams will follow, and the anticipation is growing already.

Ibérico pigs from outside Jabugo were first imported into the United States in 2008, all from the slaughterhouse and curing sheds of Fermin, still the only Spanish company to meet U.S. regulations for meat slaughtering. Now Sánchez Romero Carvajal is partnering with Fermin so that the prestigious Jabugo hams with the 5J brand can be processed through that plant.

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Recipes: Scrambled eggs with wild mushrooms and ham (revuelto de setas y jamon) and double-mashed potatoes (patatas revolconas).

Ham lovers quickly snatched up those first ibéricos despite starting prices of more than $1,400 for a 16-pound whole, bone-in ham. The first Jabugo hams will go even higher. One website already advertises a pre-order special of $1,795 for a 5J ham.

Ibérico designates a breed of pig — more about that later. The next important bit of label lingo is bellota, which means “acorn,” and it is applied only to hams made from free-range ibérico pigs that were fattened on acorns. Ibérico bellota hams are the crème de la crème, and those from Jabugo are the most treasured of all.

Ibérico-breed pigs, descended from the wild boar that once roamed Mediterranean lands, are the color of the dark stones that are stacked into low walls dividing up pastures. Many — but not all — have black hoofs, thus the popular name, pata negra, or “black foot.” They are built like barrels on slim legs. Big ears tip forward like a baseball cap to shade their eyes from fierce sun. They have long snouts, the better for rooting, and slim legs and ankles, the better for foraging over distances.

What distinguishes this breed from regular porkers (such as Large White, Landrace and Duroc) is that they are very slow to mature, never reaching the size of hogs destined to be pork chops. The ibérico breed, adapted to its habitat, has the unusual characteristic of storing fat marbled within the muscle, rather than wrapped around the outside. This makes it less profitable as a meat producer but makes for superior ham, as the fat is essential to its flavor. The breed might have disappeared had it not been so well adapted to its rustic habitat, providing the people of the region a sustainable rural culture based around the pig.

The dehesa, where the ibérico originates, is a unique ecosystem of rolling meadowland interspersed with stands of wild holm and cork oak that exists in the western reaches of Spain. From October to February — the fattening period called the montanera — the pigs range freely through the dehesa, feeding on fallen acorns, grass, roots, bulbs, herbs. Each hog eats about 18 pounds of acorns every day, doubling its weight during the three- to four-month period before slaughter. A pig needs 15 pounds of acorns to gain 1 pound of weight.

The pigs are able to crack the acorns, discarding the shells, to get at the kernel. The acorns are rich in oleic acid, the same found in olive oil, which makes the hams high in monounsaturated fat. That’s why acorn-fattened ibérico pigs are sometimes called an “olive tree on four legs.”

At the end of the montanera, when the pigs reach optimum weight of 350 to 400 pounds at 12 to 18 months of age, they are trucked to a matadero, or slaughterhouse and processing plant.

Butchers carve off the hams (hind legs) and paletas (front legs), both of which are cured. They separate enormous slabs of fat, which will be melted down to lard. The belly bacon, panceta, is salted down for keeping. Workers separate other parts to be sold as fresh meat or be ground up for sausage. (Ibérico sausages also are available in the U.S.)

The hams are then sent to expert perfiladores, men who sculpt the hams, removing skin and all but about 1 inch of fat covering. Hams are incised with a long V, while paletas are marked with a U. Hoofs are kept intact, except for those being exported to the United States.

Next, the hams and paletas are packed, one by one, in sea salt (with a very small amount of nitrate and nitrite, used in almost all hams and sausages, to prevent bacterial growth and oxidation) where they stay 10 to 12 days, depending on their weight.

The hams then are brushed free of salt and washed in clear water. They spend about 45 days in a cold locker, where the temperature is very gradually raised and the humidity lowered. This controlled stabilization period allows the hams to be processed with less time in salt than in bygone days, when the drying process was dependent on the seasonal change from winter to spring weather.

Then the hams are hung, one by one, in a secadero, or drying hall, situated high in the eaves of the processing plants. Slatted shutters keep out the sun and let in air. Hams hang there throughout the summer, “sweating” during hot weather as the unsaturated fat liquefies slightly, bathing the meat in the nutty flavor derived from the acorn diet. Enzymes begin the process of turning meat into cured ham.

At the end of the summer the hams are transferred to the bodega, a dim cellar with thick walls where humidity encourages the growth of flor, a mold that contributes to the curing process. Like fine wine and cheese, hams mature and develop flavor and complex bouquet during this aging process that lasts 12 months or more. The whole process takes 21/2 to three years. During that time, the leg of pork loses almost a third of its weight.

In Spain, ibérico ham is served on its own, the better to appreciate its aroma, flavor and texture. Plain bread or toast with olive oil may accompany the ham, which is cut in translucently thin slices. Each slice has a rim of fat and is streaked with fat. The flesh is rosy-red, the fat creamy white.

There’s a reason for slicing it thinly, says Miguel Ullibarri, former director of Real Ibérico, a consortium of ibérico ham producers, and now a director of A Taste of Spain, a tour company specializing in food and wine tours. “If you put a thick piece in your mouth, the instinct is to immediately start chewing. You should pick up the ham with your fingers to warm it slightly, then allow the ham to temper on the tongue. The fat begins to melt, liberating the aroma and flavor.”

Once warmed on the tongue and gently chewed, the ham nearly melts, flooding the mouth and nose with flavor. It is the most umami of foods. It has “mouth-feel,” succulence, aroma and flavor on the tongue, plus that special quality that comes as taste and aroma mingle. It is sweet, nutty, subtly earthy. Amazingly, unsalty.

Maybe even better than the best ham in the world.

KNOW YOUR HAM:

Jamón Serrano. Cured ham made anywhere in Spain from cross-breed pigs, such as Duroc, Large White.

Jamón Ibérico. Cured ham made from ibérico breed pigs raised in the dehesa forests in southwestern Andalusia, Extremadura and western Castille.

Ibérico or Ibérico de Recebo. Designates ham from ibérico pigs finished on pig feed and grain, not acorns.

Ibérico de Bellota. Designates ham from ibérico pigs fattened on acorns.

Ibérico de Jabugo. Acorn-fed ibérico pigs from the town of Jabugo.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.