Archive for the ‘Round Bale Feeder’ Category

omafra.gov.on.ca

Hay is a good and, usually, an inexpensive source of energy, protein, vitamins and minerals for the horse. The mature horse will consume at least 2% of its body weight in dry matter daily. In nature, almost all of the mature horse’s nutrient requirements can be met by roughage in the form of hay. Regardless of the package type, e.g., small squares, round bales, etc., the most important considerations when buying hay are:

  • The quality of the hay, e.g., dust free (from molds), a crude protein content of 12-14% on a dry matter basis, a calcium to phosphorus ratio (Ca:P) of approximately 2:1 for growing horses (mature horses Ca:P ratio < 5:1).
  • Freedom from noxious weeds (e.g., bracken fern, horsetail) and plants that horses won’t eat (e.g., Bird’s-foot trefoil).
  • The price per pound or kilogram.
  • The package size. Can you physically handle small square bales ranging in weight from 35-60 lbs. or round bales and round bale silage ranging from 500 to 1600 lbs.?
  • Do you have the equipment that can handle large bales in winter with the additional problems created by snow?

When feeding a group of horses, hay costs become considerable and alternative package sizes, such as large round bales, may be especially useful and cost effective when combined with the appropriate feeders. For example, when feeding a group of six adult horses, the use of 4′ x 5′ soft-core round bales can result in savings over the use of traditional square bales. The cost savings come from: reduced labour, both during the initial haying season and during the feeding period; reduced storage costs (large bale storage is often cheaper than storage for small bales); and reduced costs of the actual dry matter on a cents-per-pound basis.

Let us see how tangible these savings really are by calculating the roughage costs for feeding a group of six horses:

  • An 1100-lb. horse consuming 2% of its body weight will consume 22 lbs. of dry matter or roughly 24 lbs. of hay on an as-fed basis (1100-lb. horse x 2% body weight = 22 lbs. of hay/horse/day on a dry matter basis. Hay is roughly 90% dry matter. Therefore, another 10% should be added, resulting in approximately 24.4 lbs. of hay being consumed per horse per day on an as-fed weight basis).
  • Six horses will consume approximately 6 x 24.4 or 146.4 lbs. of hay per day.
  • When hay is priced at $0.05/lb. (on an as-fed basis), a 4′ x 5′ mixed hay round bale providing 565 lbs. of hay (see Table 1) costs approximately $28. This bale should last approximately 4 days, baring any losses and would cost $7.00 per day to feed six horses.
  • To feed the same group of six horses, 3 square bales per day (weighing 48 lbs. per bale) would be required. At a cost of $2.50 per bale, the cost would be $7.50 per day.

Use local costs to calculate this comparison for your area. In many areas, and depending on the harvest year, the cost of hay in round bales on a cents/lb. basis is often significantly less than that sold in small square bales. At these times, feeding round bales can be more cost effective. However, when the cost of hay on a per pound basis is the same regardless of package type and size (round versus small), the economic advantage of using round bales will be based primarily on labor saving.

These savings can easily be diminished if losses from controllable factors, such as storage and the use of feeders, are not implemented. In fact, round-bale feeding can be more expensive than the feeding of small square bales. Storage of large round bales outside, exposed to the elements, results in dry-matter losses of 15-20% more than hay stored inside. Hay loss is attributed to outer-layer losses from weathering and to pulling of ground moisture into the base of the bale by wick action. To understand this loss all one has to do is to visualize spoilage of the mere outer 3″ of a 4′-diameter bale. This will result in a 25% loss of suitable feed. In addition, improperly stored hay is often dusty and can cause health concerns in horses.

To prevent spoilage losses, round bales can be stored inside a barn or outside covered with black plastic or bale tarps; in either case, they must be raised off the ground. This will prevent both spoilage and loss of nutrients. The absorption of ground moisture can easily double the amount of outer-layer losses. The use of rails, poles or pallets will minimize spoilage from ground moisture.

Table 1: How Much Hay is in a Round Bale? (prepared by Daniel Tasse, OMAF) Estimates of the weights based on a soft-core baler (add 20% for a hard core)

Feeding hay on the ground can account for a further 25% loss, from leaf loss as well as spoilage due to contamination (i.e. urine and manure) and trampling by horses. Therefore, it is advised to use hay feeders such as a “V” feeder with a tray to catch the leaves (Figure 1) or a round-bale feeder (Figure 2).

The proper storage and use of round bales can account for a 50% saving, which translates into half the number of bales needed. Table 2 gives a cost comparison for various storage and feeding methods.

Table 2: A Cost Comparison of Various Feeding Methods.

The theoretical calculations are based on:

  • A 220-day winter feeding period for 6 horses requiring 32,208 lbs. of hay with no dry matter losses.
  • The required nutrients could be supplied, if there were no feeding or storage losses, either as 57 – 4′ x 5′, 565-lb. round bales (cost of $28 each) or as 671 48-lb. square bales (cost of $2.50 each).
  • Losses, as indicated above, will require an increase in hay and added costs.
  • *The calculations indicate that 57 bales are required but 50% of the dry matter would be lost resulting in 28.5 additional bales being required but 50% of the 28.5 would also be lost for a total requirement of 99.75.

Take Home Message

  • Purchase hay on a cents-per-pound basis.
  • Round bale feeders are labor saving but can be dusty and costly if storage and feeding damage/losses are not minimized.
  • The feeding of horses starts with buying good hay, storing it properly and feeding to minimize leaf losses.
  • The cost of feeders and suitable storage protection can easily be recouped over a couple of winters, even when hay prices are relatively low.

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by Marisa Watson | authorpalace.com

Several farm animals can use a round bale feeder. Zoos can also use these if their animals will be eating hay. The right feeder for your situation is important. It will keep the animals from urinating on it but they will still be able to eat. These are not right for every farm though.

Hay Hopper Round Bale Feeder for Cattle & Buffalo. Get yours at barnworld.com.

Whether you have a lot of horses, cows or something else, you may be looking to purchase something that you can feed them in. Some people will feed square bales while others will feed the round ones. There are different sizes, styles and colors of these feeders also.

There are also covered ones available. These are nice if the hay is not going to be eaten up right away. If it gets wet, it can mold. This keeps the hay from going bad. Most times when a round bale is being used, there is more than one animal eating off of it.

You can also make a feeder. They can be made out of wood. The ones that are easy to find and bought are the galvanized steel ones. These are painted in several colors also. The paint will not harm the animal either. Many stores that sell farm supplies will sell this type. There are ones that may cost more than others. Some of them can be broke apart into two pieces for easy transporting also.

One advantage to having one of these is that it keeps the smaller animals from getting trampled. One animal can be on one side while the other one can be on the other side. It can avoid the fighting over the food.

They are easily moved if you need to also. They can be rolled if need be. This is very convenient if you are changing pastures or moving places that you are feeding. Round bales are easily placed in them too.

A lot of people move them with tractors. The easiest way is to drop the bale over the top of it. It does not have a way that it has to be set specifically either. If the animal can eat it, it is in there good enough.

There are many advantages to using a round bale feeder. Compared to the price of the hay that is being wasted without using one of these, the price of the feeder is small. These are not only easier to use but they can save you money also.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

gallagher.com.au

With large, easy-to-press buttons, back-lit screens for shed use and the ability to record up to 60,000 animal weights, the latest innovations in weigh-scale technology give farmers and consultants more options than ever before.

Increased farm profitability and user ease are the drivers behind Gallagher’s new generation of weigh-scale technology.

The animal-management system expert has launched a brand new model in the range — the W610. This will be particularly useful in the sheep industry, which is increasingly realising the productivity benefits of electronic tag identification (EID).

The Gallagher-branded range also includes upgraded models of the entry-level weigh scale W210 and W310, plus new W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector, as well as the revolutionary SmartTSi complete livestock management system.

Mike Hemsley, product manager for Gallagher Animal Management Systems, says the new-generation models have resulted from Gallagher’s continual-improvement process.

“We know from research, and simply from what we have out working in paddocks across Australia, that our products are good. Our aim is to make those good products even better in design and usability.”

Flexible W610 has massive memory

Mr Hemsley says the new W610 model is the best entry-level EID weighing system available.

“The W610 can connect to any brand of EID reader and has a massive memory that can store weight readings from 12,000 animals. Additional livestock-management information, such as average daily weight gain and carcase weight, can be calculated and displayed automatically on the two large LCD screens when the animal is weighed.”

The W610 also enables five-way drafting by weight, and includes a full keyboard for manually logging visual IDs.

Back-lit screen, tougher construction

The upgraded W210 and W310, plus new W610 and W810 models, have a tougher construction, larger back-lit screens, raised keyboards and ergonomically operated switches and buttons. Being back-lit, the screens are easy to read in low-light conditions, such as inside a shed.

Mr Hemsley says the W210 has a “clamshell farm-ready toughness”, large buttons for easy selection and a big rotary dial, all of which make it simple to use. It has auto-weight locking or manual-weighing modes and a rechargeable battery.

A step up from the W210, the W310 can sort two ways, and, like the W610 and W810, it shows weighing statistics on screen.

The W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector has even easier data collection than the Ruddweigh 800, which it replaces. On top of the benefits of the W610, it also has internal bluetooth for easier connectivity to electronic readers. The W810 also records the date of every weight measurement and allows the user to enter and edit notes on each recording entry, and can store 21,000 animal IDs and 60,000 weight recordings. It can be set to draft up to nine ways: by EID, list and/or by weight.

SmartTSi

The SmartTSi is Gallagher’s premier animal-management system. Advanced, yet simple-to-use, SmartTSi combines a computer, weigh scale and animal-performance software.

Its intuitive touch-screen ensures that recording and accessing individual animal or herd information is simple and fast, saving farmers time when weighing animals.

Mike Hemsley says SmartTSi models to be released early this year will feature a software upgrade that will also be available to existing SmartTSi users.

“The software upgrade for existing SmartTSi users will be absolutely free. We like users of our technology to have the best tools in their hands.”

Unique full range

Mr Hemsley said the addition of the W610 model to the new-generation range of weigh scales means Gallagher can meet any customer’s needs. All products are backed by a market-leading on-farm sales and support service team.

The range, which was launched on 1 February, sees Gallagher as the only company with a full range of permanent and portable EID readers, software, loadbars, weigh scales and tags.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

Anyone who has cattle, horses, sheep or any other medium to large sized livestock that is fed hay or silage or even any other kind of feed that they do not want the stock to tramp on, whether it is in the winter months or all through the year would probably benefit from the use of a round bale feeder.

Being formed in a complete circle this allows the livestock feeding from it access to all points, and to be able to spread out around the outside of the feeding system allowing all stock a chance to have a feed and move out easily when they are pushed by others in the group.

The feeder is around six feet or one and a half meters in diameter and has a piece of metal or flat tin which extends up the sides to about half a meter or approximately two feet and attaches to a second ring, this is probably lower if using for sheep etc.,

Vertical bars rise from this to about three feet or a meter and are attached to another ring at the top, being either straight or at an angle of around forty five degrees. Stock have easy access to the feed due to the reasonably wide spacings between these.

These are useful for hay or silage made in the round bale shape, but are also used for the small square bales and other types of feed. They can be easily loaded by a tractor with a silage or hay attachment on the front end loader. The stock although they can easily reach when feeding cannot waste the feed as they would if the bale where put into an open area.

The bars around the outside are set wide enough apart for stock to access the feed easily, but they are not able to get in where the feed actually is. They are also wide enough for any animal to back out quickly if a bully decides they want that particular spot. Being a reasonable weight they are able to be moved fairly easily to cleaner ground when the need arises.

They are made reasonable strong and can withstand a fair bit of pushing and shoving by stock and are useful for waste reduction. Those who are interested in checking this product out may like to visit their local agricultural machinery dealer, or a visit to the local produce merchant may be of help. Another area to check out is the websites on the internet.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

deltafarmpress.com

Krogmann Manufacturing of Sabetha, Kan., recently unveiled their newest product, the Krogmann feeder trailer, designed to efficiently transport and feed large round bales to cattle on location.

This feeder trailer was built to keep hay waste at a very minimum. Results have shown the Krogmann to save between 20 percent to 30 percent of hay over conventional hay feeders.

The racks will fold flat for moving hay off fields and they quickly fold in feeder position saving time. Producers can load and haul or feed without getting off the tractor. Each model can hold and feed several large round bales.

Trailer level height allows cattle easy access to hay with less waste, saving fuel, time and hay. The standard size feeder trailer comes in 20-foot or 28-foot lengths.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

By: Sarah Beatty

A University of Minnesota study showed that round bale feeders, particularly cone feeders, dramatically reduce hay waste according to TheHorse.com.

The researchers, led by Krishona Martinson, PhD., examined three different feeders: the tombstone, the cone and the curtain. Tombstone feeders completely cover the lower half of the round bale and have tombstone-shaped projections covering the upper half; they are open on the top. Cone feeders contain the round bale entirely within the structure. Horses must reach through metal bars to access the hay. Curtain feeders operate on a rotation. They open and are accessible to horses for four hours and then close for two.

They found that the tombstone feeder allowed 15 percent hay waste, the cone feeder allowed 8 percent, and the curtain feeder allowed 9 percent. Using no feeder resulted in a 38 percent hay loss.

Although the cone feeder and curtain feeder had similarly low results in hay waste, researchers didn’t recommend the curtain feeder as it may encourage mane rubbing.

The researchers also determined that owners would earn back the money used to purchase the feeders through more efficient hay use. They plan to test six more feeders this summer.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.