Archive for the ‘Hay feeders’ Category

by Cynthia Cooper | naturalhorseworld.com

With many parts of the world affected by weather extremes, feed for horses is getting more expensive and less readily available, so it makes sense to stretch what you can get as far as possible.

So how do we do that without compromising our horse’s health and well being?

It’s a question I’ve been thinking on a lot lately as my horses have challeged me to balance the quantity they need for healthy gut function (and not eating weeds), with keeping them down to healthy weight, most being mature riding horses verging on the fat side!

One of the big discoveries I made is that hay fed loose on the ground can be gobbled up quickly leaving the herd hungry for more even after eating their entire ration which is based on their combined body weight.

It’s easy to work out – I have seven horses in one herd – there are four that weigh close to 400kg and 3 that weigh around 500kg so thats a total of 3100kg. As they have no pasture to speak of, I’m feeding them 2.5% of their body weight in food a day – that’s 10kg per 400kg horse and 12.5kg per 500kg horse – a combined total of 77.5kg.

As they get a small feed of chaff and minerals which weighs less than a kilo each, I’m left with providing 77kg of hay so I weighed my bales and they average 17kg each resulting in 4.5 bales per day for the herd. Phew – I knew I did maths at school for a reason!

So to combat the guzzling nature of horses that have no pasture, I made hay feeders that have a mesh screen they have to pull the hay through and it stops them tossing it all over the place to get to the seeds. These are old apple bins and fit a bale on each side.

I had to put a screen on one so that the ‘hog feeder‘ (2nd in command) allowed someone to share with him!

Sioux Supreme Hog Feeder - 40 Bushel Complete, available at barnworld.com

The biggest issue with this is that they just stand around in one place for a large part of the day – at least they have to walk down the hill to get to water. Some days they go out to graze a strip of track I’m eating out so the amount of hay is halved then, and they get to walk a further back to the water.

So I started looking for ideas on how to make some way of containing hay that made them work to get it, and could be easily put up in several places around the 10 acres they occupy.

My breeding herd have also presented a challenge in that some of them can cope with grass and need it, while others couldn’t. My old broodmare who is generally a good doer, had developed greasy heel from being allowed too much rich grass in spring because I mistakenly assumed she would need extra to make all that milk for her foal.

I’ve discovered through trial and error in the process of clearing up the greasy heal, that the tall stemmy grass with seeds (usually cocksfoot and ryegrass) will cause her leg to flare up right away. I could actually see more swelling and weeping of toxins at the end of the day when she was allowed out on the seedy grass. My solution was to set up a track around the paddock to stimulate more movement, and slash the seeded grass on the track, leaving it for a couple of weeks to dry out – it was even rained on so that washed more sugars out. Freshly slashed grass can have more toxins that affect horses as the grass tries to recover, so its a good idea to leave it at least a week or two before allowing horses back on.

Now, as the track gets eaten down, I can let the youngsters in the middle for a few hours a day to eat a bit extra, and the mare can stay out on feed she can tolerate, supplemented with a bit of hay and her regular minerals and chaff. The beauty of this is that the mare can move around with the herd so no-one feels left out or in need of running through a fence. It’s also a great way to wean a foal as they are only stopped from drinking and not from being near their mum.

The more I look for information on using tracks, commonly called Paddock Paradise, the more I see it as the ultimate way to keep horses and stretch the grass consumption over a longer period of time too. During the drought, the track can be the sacrifice area and the majority of the pasture can survive with reduced or minimal grazing.

In spring, the track is the safest place for equines prone to laminitis, tender hooves, and behavioural problems associated with rye grass consumption – or even with weed consumption such as flatweed (false dandelion) that causes stringhalt. In this case you would need to scrape the track back to bare dirt and feed hay.

To counteract the problem of manure and not having the ability to pick it all up (most of our pastures are on steep land so impossible to use a ‘poo sucker’ as I call them), I’m setting up a track in every paddock so the horses can be rotated around them, allowing some to rest.

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

hoofcareunltd.com

Slow feeding is important, but continuous slow feeding is much more important.

Continuous slow feeding does not work until your horse has forgotten that there is an end to the hay supply. As long as he remembers that there might be an end to the supply of hay he will most likely still eat too fast and not chew the food enough. Chewing is extremely important for a horse. It is when he has chewed enough he feels content, not when he has filled his stomach. If he does not chew enough he will not be able to digest the food the way he is supposed to. When the Continuous slow feeding starts to work your horse will show you both more harmony and more willingness to work. He might also be friendlier to other horses and easier to handle.

Horse Hay Feeder - 3 Piece Round 8ft w/Steel Lower Enclosure - 16 gauge frame. (Picture courtesy of www.barnworld.com)

It is extremely important that your horse never can fill his mouth with hay. When your horse fills his mouth with food he will not chew it enough and the digestion will therefore not be effective. Fantastic things happen when he has learned to eat the natural way. He will even graze differently after a winter with a well working “continuous slow feeder”. This is much better than spreading the hay on the ground since it is much to easy to eat hay that is loose on the ground or on the floor. One small piece of hay at a time is the goal!

Continuous slow feeding restricts the amount of hay your horse can eat per minute instead of the amount of hay available to him. You will gain in all ends.

  • No more wasted hay.
  • Less consumption because of better digestion.
  • Your horse is kept busy eating 16-20 hours as he is supposed to.
  • Obese horses usually loose weight.
  • Thin horses usually gain weight.
  • No more fighting over food since it is always available.
  • No specific feeding times for you to keep (no early mornings or lunch feedings).
  • Your horse will never be hungry and always ready to go.

Important things to consider:

There must be hay available to the horse at all times. 1½ hours after the horse has stopped eating the unstoppable production of bile (the horse has no gall bladder, he produces and releases bile continuously) will burn the inside of the small intestine and give the horse stomach ulcers.

It is not until the horse has forgotten that the hay feeder ever can be empty that the feeding system starts to work. Then the horses slow down their eating pace, take the pauses they need and each horse in the herd takes care of their individual eating needs (we have Shetland ponies and horses eat together from the same feeders).

Give your horse three weeks to get used to this new way of being fed before passing any judgments.

If you want to know how much they are eating you must look at the average consumption over a three day period because they do not necessarily eat as much every day.

Things not to do:

Do not feed servings or portions in the hay feeders.

If you believe your horse still gets too much you can always mix the hay with oat straw of good hygienic quality. If you are absolutely sure your horse needs more get hay that contains more (but be careful with alfalfa since the balance between calcium and phosphor is completely off).

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To get more information on cattle scales, cattle guards, or saddle pads, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on grain weight conversion, hog feeders, and hay feeders, please visit Barn World.

To get more information on bulk feed bins, livestock scales, and radiant under-floor heating, please visit Barn World.

haybar.co.uk

Hay Bars’ introduction has truly revolutionised a lot of large yards. The initial investment is quickly recouped by reduced waste and reduction in ‘man hours’ spent laboriously filling hay nets.

HayBar pony feeder

Hay and haylage are the recognised feed but now we have even more choice with many different bagged forage products designed to cater for horses with various feeding problems. COPD, laminitics, dental abnormalities and horses with digestive problems all benefit from bagged forage. How to contain these chop like forages is made easier with Hay Bar. The new version Pony Hay Bar is ideal as it is even easier to clean out when feeding these hay replacements.

Feeding from the floor in the natural position is an aid to maintaining clear sinuses and helps to alleviate back and neck problems. Dental abnormalities are seen far less frequently in horses fed from Hay Bars. Both horse and owner benefit from the Hay Bar system, and with the reduced labour costs and reduction in waste of both bedding and forage, make it an investment that more than pays for itself.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

haybar.co.uk

Hay Bars’ natural feeding position has received endorsements from the dental profession. Keith Evans Eq DT “I am convinced that I would see less dental problems in horses I treat if they were fed from the floor by use of the Hay Bar. It is common sense to get the horse to eat in the way that he is designed for. We impact the horses’ environment in so many ways it can only be of benefit to offer him some form of normality in his daily life. ”

HayBar pony feeder

Wayne Abbott B.E.V.A./B.V.D.A. “One of the most important things I advise my clients is that horses benefit significantly from being able to eat at ground level when stabled. In my experience horses that are not fed from nets or racks maintain a far more balanced wear pattern to their teeth enabling them to grind properly and in turn gain full value from their food. The Hay Bar offers a practical solution to being able to provide hay/haylage in their stable and it also helps prevent bedding contamination”

Hay Bar has truly improved the quality of life for horses and owners a like. At this time of year when horses are stabled for most of their day it is important to keep their environment as natural as possible. Hay Bar helps to make this possible and also save on time and waste.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

gallagher.com.au

With large, easy-to-press buttons, back-lit screens for shed use and the ability to record up to 60,000 animal weights, the latest innovations in weigh-scale technology give farmers and consultants more options than ever before.

Increased farm profitability and user ease are the drivers behind Gallagher’s new generation of weigh-scale technology.

The animal-management system expert has launched a brand new model in the range — the W610. This will be particularly useful in the sheep industry, which is increasingly realising the productivity benefits of electronic tag identification (EID).

The Gallagher-branded range also includes upgraded models of the entry-level weigh scale W210 and W310, plus new W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector, as well as the revolutionary SmartTSi complete livestock management system.

Mike Hemsley, product manager for Gallagher Animal Management Systems, says the new-generation models have resulted from Gallagher’s continual-improvement process.

“We know from research, and simply from what we have out working in paddocks across Australia, that our products are good. Our aim is to make those good products even better in design and usability.”

Flexible W610 has massive memory

Mr Hemsley says the new W610 model is the best entry-level EID weighing system available.

“The W610 can connect to any brand of EID reader and has a massive memory that can store weight readings from 12,000 animals. Additional livestock-management information, such as average daily weight gain and carcase weight, can be calculated and displayed automatically on the two large LCD screens when the animal is weighed.”

The W610 also enables five-way drafting by weight, and includes a full keyboard for manually logging visual IDs.

Back-lit screen, tougher construction

The upgraded W210 and W310, plus new W610 and W810 models, have a tougher construction, larger back-lit screens, raised keyboards and ergonomically operated switches and buttons. Being back-lit, the screens are easy to read in low-light conditions, such as inside a shed.

Mr Hemsley says the W210 has a “clamshell farm-ready toughness”, large buttons for easy selection and a big rotary dial, all of which make it simple to use. It has auto-weight locking or manual-weighing modes and a rechargeable battery.

A step up from the W210, the W310 can sort two ways, and, like the W610 and W810, it shows weighing statistics on screen.

The W810 Advanced EID Weigh Scale and Data Collector has even easier data collection than the Ruddweigh 800, which it replaces. On top of the benefits of the W610, it also has internal bluetooth for easier connectivity to electronic readers. The W810 also records the date of every weight measurement and allows the user to enter and edit notes on each recording entry, and can store 21,000 animal IDs and 60,000 weight recordings. It can be set to draft up to nine ways: by EID, list and/or by weight.

SmartTSi

The SmartTSi is Gallagher’s premier animal-management system. Advanced, yet simple-to-use, SmartTSi combines a computer, weigh scale and animal-performance software.

Its intuitive touch-screen ensures that recording and accessing individual animal or herd information is simple and fast, saving farmers time when weighing animals.

Mike Hemsley says SmartTSi models to be released early this year will feature a software upgrade that will also be available to existing SmartTSi users.

“The software upgrade for existing SmartTSi users will be absolutely free. We like users of our technology to have the best tools in their hands.”

Unique full range

Mr Hemsley said the addition of the W610 model to the new-generation range of weigh scales means Gallagher can meet any customer’s needs. All products are backed by a market-leading on-farm sales and support service team.

The range, which was launched on 1 February, sees Gallagher as the only company with a full range of permanent and portable EID readers, software, loadbars, weigh scales and tags.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

Anyone who has cattle, horses, sheep or any other medium to large sized livestock that is fed hay or silage or even any other kind of feed that they do not want the stock to tramp on, whether it is in the winter months or all through the year would probably benefit from the use of a round bale feeder.

Being formed in a complete circle this allows the livestock feeding from it access to all points, and to be able to spread out around the outside of the feeding system allowing all stock a chance to have a feed and move out easily when they are pushed by others in the group.

The feeder is around six feet or one and a half meters in diameter and has a piece of metal or flat tin which extends up the sides to about half a meter or approximately two feet and attaches to a second ring, this is probably lower if using for sheep etc.,

Vertical bars rise from this to about three feet or a meter and are attached to another ring at the top, being either straight or at an angle of around forty five degrees. Stock have easy access to the feed due to the reasonably wide spacings between these.

These are useful for hay or silage made in the round bale shape, but are also used for the small square bales and other types of feed. They can be easily loaded by a tractor with a silage or hay attachment on the front end loader. The stock although they can easily reach when feeding cannot waste the feed as they would if the bale where put into an open area.

The bars around the outside are set wide enough apart for stock to access the feed easily, but they are not able to get in where the feed actually is. They are also wide enough for any animal to back out quickly if a bully decides they want that particular spot. Being a reasonable weight they are able to be moved fairly easily to cleaner ground when the need arises.

They are made reasonable strong and can withstand a fair bit of pushing and shoving by stock and are useful for waste reduction. Those who are interested in checking this product out may like to visit their local agricultural machinery dealer, or a visit to the local produce merchant may be of help. Another area to check out is the websites on the internet.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

deltafarmpress.com

Krogmann Manufacturing of Sabetha, Kan., recently unveiled their newest product, the Krogmann feeder trailer, designed to efficiently transport and feed large round bales to cattle on location.

This feeder trailer was built to keep hay waste at a very minimum. Results have shown the Krogmann to save between 20 percent to 30 percent of hay over conventional hay feeders.

The racks will fold flat for moving hay off fields and they quickly fold in feeder position saving time. Producers can load and haul or feed without getting off the tractor. Each model can hold and feed several large round bales.

Trailer level height allows cattle easy access to hay with less waste, saving fuel, time and hay. The standard size feeder trailer comes in 20-foot or 28-foot lengths.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.