Archive for March 2011

The Readers of National Hog Farmer are again looking forward to the “2011 New Product Tour” Issues. Now is your chance to put focus on products/services introduced to the industry in the past year.

Over 20,000 engaged pork producers will learn more about the features and benefits that make your new product valuable.

2010 World Pork Expo New Product Showcase
Shines Spotlight on Most Promising New Products
Pork industry innovators have been busy coming up with a variety of new products to help producers save money and improve efficiency this year. National Hog Farmer is pleased to offer our readers and World Pork Expo attendees an opportunity to learn more about new products and services recently introduced to the pork industry.

A panel of pork industry experts will be taking a close look at the new products on behalf of our pork producer readers. And you can join the review process too. Come visit the National Hog Farmerbooth #623 in the Varied Industries Building at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines during World Pork Expo and cast your vote for the most promising new product. When you cast your vote, you are automatically entered in a daily prize drawing.

New Product Tour Nominees

In the meantime, go ahead and get a head start on the new product tour by taking a look at the new product nominations featured below. National Hog Farmer’s New Product Review Panel will share their thoughts in a special feature in the July 15 issue. And the votes cast by World Pork Expo attendees will select the “producer’s choice” new product.

SmartIR Feed Sensor
AP’s SmartIR Feed System Sensor controls all functions of a feed delivery system by using six infrared beams to detect the presence of feed. The system is not affected by changes in temperature, humidity or feed type and does not require any sensitivity adjustments. An alarm can provide notification if an out-of-feed event is occurring. The large digital display and system status LEDs are designed for easy reading. SmartIR can be adapted to nearly all new or existing feed systems.

Learn more at
www.automatedproduction.com
Call 217-226-4449 or
email apsales@automatedproduction.com.
Visit Booth No. 179 VIB


Sepcom Manure Solids Separator
Agpro introduces the Sepcom screw press-type manure solids separator to the U.S. market. The separator features a steel-reinforced polymer screw and a quick-replace, wedge wire screen. A patented outlet orifice plate requires no weights or cylinders. The use of a polymer screw against a stainless steel screen significantly extends component life and lowers maintenance challenges. Varying pitch screw and screen openings helps contribute to the ultimate in solids removal. The Sepcom Manure Solids Separator has been in use for over three years in Europe.

Learn more at
www.agprousa.com
Call 800-527-1030 or
email agpro@neto.com
Visit Booth No. 676 VIB


New Pig Plus Combination Tag
Allflex has developed an identification tag combination to help aid in easy identification as the pig grows. The new Piglet tag male is combined with the softer, more pliable Pig+ female, which is placed on the inner side of the ear. The Pig+ female panel tag allows for deep or higher application on the small ear and allows for free rotation of the two tags. The all-plastic Piglet male tag is placed on the outside of the ear and can stand up in the environment. Both pieces can be custom laser-marked at an economical price.

Learn more at
www.allflexusa.com
Call 515-708-6804 or
email pflint@allflexusa.com
Visit Booth No. 366 VIB


Sure Drop
The Sure Drop from Improved Solutions, Inc. is a new device designed to work with existing release devices on the market to open sidewall curtains to help protect pigs during overheating and power-failure events. A unique design allows the lock handle to drop, eliminating the need for a hand winch to unwind. The Sure-Drop includes a mounting panel with two fixed pulleys, the cable release device, and the moveable pulley pre-mounted on the panel. The panel is configured to work as either a left- or right-hand device.

Call 618-895-1318 or
email suredrop1@gmail.com
Visit Booth No. 607 VIB


First Step™ Feed
First Step Creep Feed helps create “eaters” prior to weaning. Designed for baby pigs from 14-25 days of age, First Step uses a unique form, proprietary palatants and specialty ingredients in order to optimize feed intake while supporting the developing immune and digestive systems. Research shows creating eaters pre-weaning helps optimize post-weaning gain.

Learn more at
www.UltraCareFeed.com
Visit Booth No. 356 – 360 VIB


Swinewater Manure Treatment System
Livestock Water Recycling has developed a pre-manufactured Manure Treatment System designed to be placed directly at the swine production site. Installation of the system eliminates the need for a manure storage lagoon. The end products of the Manure Treatment System include clean, re-usable water, dry solids and concentrated, nutrient-rich fertilizer.

Learn more at
www.livestockwaterrecycling.com
Call 403-203-4972 or
email karen.schuett@livestockwaterrecycling.com
Visit Booth No. CB 2902 at World Pork Expo Outdoor


Mi-T-M CWC-3005 Pressure Washer
The Mi-T-M CWC cold water pressure washer offers an abundance of pressure in a compact, user-friendly unit. A new, narrow roll-cage frame design will fit through any 30-in. door and provides a center eye lifting hook. This belt-drive unit features a heavy duty, low rpm, 5-gpm pump and industrial TEFC 10-hp. motor, producing 3000 psi of cleaning power. The unit rolls easily on four wheels.

Learn more at
www.washersystems.com
Call 800-433-8441 or
email wsoiegli@mchsi.com
Visit Booth No. 4012 OA


Swine Management Tool Series (SMTS)
The Swine Management Tool Series (SMTS) is a suite of software comprised of ten, fully integrated modules. The software offers farm-to-fork information traceability, wireless remote data capture solutions and superior web-designed reporting. From wean to harvest, every segment of information related to the swine live-production cycle, including technical field service data and group accounting data, can be tracked and analyzed. Planning modules allow users to forecast future market fluctuations and plan for production changes.

Learn more at
www.Mtech-Systems.com
Call 678-990-2345 or
email sales@mtech-systems.com
Visit Booth No. 553 VIB


ParaSail®
Newport Laboratories offers ParaSail®, the swine industry’s first avirulent live, single-dose vaccine for Haemophilus parasuis. Available exclusively through veterinarians, ParaSail has been proven to protect against three of the most predominant strains of H. parasuis currently circulating including serotype 4, serotype 5, and serotype 13. The USDA has approved ParaSail for use as a single-dose product with a 1- ml. intramuscular dose size for pigs aged 21 days or older.

Learn more at
www.parasailprotection.com
Call 800-220-2522 ext. 3030 or
email info@parasailprotection.com
Visit Booth No. 152 VIB


NORSVIN® LY – The Full Program
Norsvin USA introduces the NORSVIN® LY Full Program F1 breeding gilt. This parent female combines traits of the NORSVIN® Landrace with NORSVIN® Yorkshire resulting in the first NORSVIN® LYfemales for U.S. producers. Norsvin genetics provide superior productivity in both total pigs born and total weaned while achieving excellent weaning weights. Norsvin breeding stock balances outstanding structure and underlines with feed efficiency, growth and carcass quality, contributing to top market hog performance.

Learn more at
www.norsvinusa.com
Call 507-259-7604 or
email dale.hover@norsvinusa.com
Visit Booth No. 628 VIB


MaxKlor
Preserve International’s new stabilized chlorine dioxide product, MaxKlor, is a great step in water treatment for pork producers. MaxKlor is EPA registered to inactivate bacteria, viruses, protozoa and algae in watering systems for animals, and is also approved for drinking water for pigs and humans. It oxidizes minerals like iron and manganese for removal through filtration. Disinfect traditional pathogens like fecal coliform and E. Coli without creating resistance, while also killing newer, more resilient pathogens.

Learn more at
www.preserveinternational.com
Call 800-995-1607 or
email stuartheller@bellsouth.net
Visit Booth No. 506 VIB


Life Savior

SEC Repro, Inc. offers the Life Savior to help prevent piglet crushing in the farrowing crate up to six days after birth. A sensor on the Life Savior unit triggers a blower to send a stream of air between the sow’s legs when she sits, stands or moves. Piglets move out of the danger zone when hit by the air stream. The washable Life Savior can be installed in the piglet “comfort zone” with most farrowing crates.

Learn more at
www.secrepro.com
Call 450-776-0596 or
email louis@secrepro.com
Visit Booth No. 633 VIB


Sector Probe Extension

The Sector Probe Extension from SEC Repro, Inc. helps improve safety while protecting the ultrasound probe during pregnancy checking by allowing sows to be scanned from outside of the gestation crate. A 15-in. hollow, molded plastic pipe allows the Agroscan probe to be inserted inside of the crate. The Sector Probe Extension allows the user the flexibility to pregnancy check sows on either the left or right side.

Learn more at
www.secrepro.com
Call 450-776-0596 or
email louis@secrepro.com
Visit Booth No. 633 VIB


National Swine Nutrition Guide
The 2010 National Swine Nutrition Guide (NSNG) is a practical publication containing 35 nutrition Factsheets with nutrient recommendations and feeding guidelines. The NSNG also comes complete with a booklet containing nutrient recommendation tables from the Factsheets, and a Diet Formulation and Evaluation CD. Producers can use the CD to formulate swine diets on a least-cost basis and to evaluate the nutritional adequacy of existing diets for sows, boars, nursery pigs, growing and finishing pigs, replacement gilts and boars.

Learn more at
www.usporkcenter.org
Call 515-294-7556 or
email drdave@iastate.edu
Visit Booth No. 150 VIB


VivaSound 16/128 Echograph
UNGAVA is introducing the portable VivaSound 16/128 Echograph to the veterinary market. The compact, battery-operated hand-held unit features a 100% digital beamformer to help provide crisp images. Its aluminum and rubber casing makes it extremely durable for daily operation under farm conditions. The unit is designed for easy connection to a personal computer. The product is also ready for real-time in vivo Intramuscular Fat (IMF) readings.

Learn more at
www.ungava-tech.com
Call +1-418-266-1077 or
email info@ungava-tech.com
Visit Booth No. 261 VIB


Ventra PRO Controller
The new and expanded Ventra PRO Controller from VAL-CO™ incorporates a hardware redesign for better field serviceability by including plug-in relays, wire rerouting for reduced electrical interference and allowing easier wiring via plug-in terminals. A software redesign offers expanded capability for tracking propane usage and providing the ability to store multiple programs on an SD card. The Ventra PRO Controller provides one-touch access to pertinent information such as daily high/low temperatures, water usage, feeder run times, etc., all in one simple menu at the touch of a button.

Learn more at
www.valcompanies.com
Call 717-354-4586 ext. 451 or
email sales@valcompanies.com
Visit Booth No. 637 VIB


PICS
PICS is an inventory control tool that helps producers save time and money by minimizing inventory shrink. Producers can receive product into the inventory, check product out to the field, add products to a simple, online ordering site and make adjustments to inventory with reason codes. The PICS has the ability to track product usage by receiving empty containers/bottles back in from the field. A handheld scanner is provided along with bar codes and necessary labels.

Learn more at
www.walcointl.com
Call 817-859-3415 or
email whitem@walcointl.com
Visit Booth No. 522 VIB


Low Stress Pig Handling for Truckers Online Training Course
The online training course, “Low Stress Pig Handling for Truckers” uses real-life video depicting the process of loading and unloading pot-bellied semi trailers as a teaching tool to help truckers learn about practical pig-handling skills. This training is designed to help truckers move stock more easily while maintaining the value of the animals being transported. Poor animal handling can cost pork producers millions of dollars every year through death, trim and meat-quality losses.

Learn more at
www.dnlfarmstraining.com
Call 306-276-5761 or
email dnlfarms@xplornet.com
Visit Booth No. 3018 CB


Key Dollar Separators
Key Dollar separators use two ½ hp. motors, are self-cleaning and use their own water, no fresh water is required. The separators hold up well and can produce water for pigs from the waste water with a little help and treatment. A standard roll press is used for composting or bedding. Five models are available to fit producer needs.

Learn more at
www.keydollar.com
Call 509-386-1220 o
email key_dollar@hotmail.com
Visit Booth No. 4317 OA

NEW PRODUCT NOMINATION FORM

World Pork Expo New Product Tour
Nomination Form

Cost of Entry: $750
Deadline for entries: April 8, 2011

Nominate your new product for the 2011 New Product Tour and take advantage of this special offer to increase your exposure:
• Place an ad on Pork Industry Express at half price – your cost: $150; valued at: $300
• National Hog Farmer TV – Supply a video to National Hog Farmer and we will post it on our Web site for one month, your cost: $200
Call for questions: 952-851-4605 or debbie.weinhold@penton.com

1. Company Name
2. Company Address
3. City
4. State
5. Zip code
6. Company Phone
7. Booth Number
8. Web site address
9. Trade name of product
10. Name and phone number of contact person
12. Email
13. Phone

14. Attach separately…a brief description of the product including why it is important to pork producers. You may include a sales brochure, copy of an ad and photos. Send 6 copies of the entry form, product description, photo and any other material to:

Debbie Weinhold
NATIONAL HOG FARMER
7900 International Drive, Suite 300
Minneapolis, MN 55425
952-851-4605

Or, send your nomination form, product description and hi-res images electronically to: debbie.weinhold@penton.com

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

nationalhogfarmer.com

Dec 30, 2009 12:47 PM

A new Iowa State University (ISU) Extension publication can help farmers track their energy use and compare their usage and costs for various energy sources. “Tracking the Energy Use on Your Farm” is available to download from the Extension Online Store.

The publication includes an energy log that can be downloaded for use with Microsoft Excel or printed and completed by hand, says Jane Flammang, ISU Extension program coordinator for the new statewide Farm Energy Conservation and Efficiency educational initiative. Farmers can use the log to track total on-farm energy use, including electricity, diesel fuel, gasoline, propane or natural gas. The Excel spreadsheet will automatically calculate a farmer’s per-unit cost and the total energy cost month to month throughout the year.

This publication is part of a series of materials designed to increase farmer awareness of methods to improve efficient use of energy and help them explore alternatives to reduce farm energy demand and improve overall profitability.

The ISU effort is made possible by a grant from the Iowa Energy Center.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

chicagotribune.com / By Janet Mendel, Special to the Los Angeles Times

Reporting from Jabugo, Andalusia, Spain — Walking into the central plaza of the small town of Jabugo, you breathe in the aroma of ibérico ham, a sweet-nutty smell so intense it’s as if it emanates from the very walls of the houses. This is the source — where ibérico pigs roam through forests of wild oak and scrabble for acorns and where their meat is converted into what many have declared the best ham in the world.

Jabugo, a town nestled in the Sierra de Aracena in southwestern Andalusia, is a name with almost mythic meaning, far out of proportion to the town’s size. That’s because Jabugo is synonymous with great ham. In a region where every little town seems to have a few butcher shops selling ibérico ham, those from Jabugo stand out. And for the first time, that ham will be available in the United States before the end of the year.

The town is famous for its hams primarily because of the Sánchez Romero Carvajal company, established there in 1879 and now owned by the multinational Osborne Group, makers of fine sherry. The company’s hams with the 5J or “Cinco Jotas” label will be available in the United States. The first to arrive probably will be paletas, or shoulder hams from the front legs, because they require a shorter curing period than hams from the rear legs. Regular hams will follow, and the anticipation is growing already.

Ibérico pigs from outside Jabugo were first imported into the United States in 2008, all from the slaughterhouse and curing sheds of Fermin, still the only Spanish company to meet U.S. regulations for meat slaughtering. Now Sánchez Romero Carvajal is partnering with Fermin so that the prestigious Jabugo hams with the 5J brand can be processed through that plant.

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Recipes: Scrambled eggs with wild mushrooms and ham (revuelto de setas y jamon) and double-mashed potatoes (patatas revolconas).

Ham lovers quickly snatched up those first ibéricos despite starting prices of more than $1,400 for a 16-pound whole, bone-in ham. The first Jabugo hams will go even higher. One website already advertises a pre-order special of $1,795 for a 5J ham.

Ibérico designates a breed of pig — more about that later. The next important bit of label lingo is bellota, which means “acorn,” and it is applied only to hams made from free-range ibérico pigs that were fattened on acorns. Ibérico bellota hams are the crème de la crème, and those from Jabugo are the most treasured of all.

Ibérico-breed pigs, descended from the wild boar that once roamed Mediterranean lands, are the color of the dark stones that are stacked into low walls dividing up pastures. Many — but not all — have black hoofs, thus the popular name, pata negra, or “black foot.” They are built like barrels on slim legs. Big ears tip forward like a baseball cap to shade their eyes from fierce sun. They have long snouts, the better for rooting, and slim legs and ankles, the better for foraging over distances.

What distinguishes this breed from regular porkers (such as Large White, Landrace and Duroc) is that they are very slow to mature, never reaching the size of hogs destined to be pork chops. The ibérico breed, adapted to its habitat, has the unusual characteristic of storing fat marbled within the muscle, rather than wrapped around the outside. This makes it less profitable as a meat producer but makes for superior ham, as the fat is essential to its flavor. The breed might have disappeared had it not been so well adapted to its rustic habitat, providing the people of the region a sustainable rural culture based around the pig.

The dehesa, where the ibérico originates, is a unique ecosystem of rolling meadowland interspersed with stands of wild holm and cork oak that exists in the western reaches of Spain. From October to February — the fattening period called the montanera — the pigs range freely through the dehesa, feeding on fallen acorns, grass, roots, bulbs, herbs. Each hog eats about 18 pounds of acorns every day, doubling its weight during the three- to four-month period before slaughter. A pig needs 15 pounds of acorns to gain 1 pound of weight.

The pigs are able to crack the acorns, discarding the shells, to get at the kernel. The acorns are rich in oleic acid, the same found in olive oil, which makes the hams high in monounsaturated fat. That’s why acorn-fattened ibérico pigs are sometimes called an “olive tree on four legs.”

At the end of the montanera, when the pigs reach optimum weight of 350 to 400 pounds at 12 to 18 months of age, they are trucked to a matadero, or slaughterhouse and processing plant.

Butchers carve off the hams (hind legs) and paletas (front legs), both of which are cured. They separate enormous slabs of fat, which will be melted down to lard. The belly bacon, panceta, is salted down for keeping. Workers separate other parts to be sold as fresh meat or be ground up for sausage. (Ibérico sausages also are available in the U.S.)

The hams are then sent to expert perfiladores, men who sculpt the hams, removing skin and all but about 1 inch of fat covering. Hams are incised with a long V, while paletas are marked with a U. Hoofs are kept intact, except for those being exported to the United States.

Next, the hams and paletas are packed, one by one, in sea salt (with a very small amount of nitrate and nitrite, used in almost all hams and sausages, to prevent bacterial growth and oxidation) where they stay 10 to 12 days, depending on their weight.

The hams then are brushed free of salt and washed in clear water. They spend about 45 days in a cold locker, where the temperature is very gradually raised and the humidity lowered. This controlled stabilization period allows the hams to be processed with less time in salt than in bygone days, when the drying process was dependent on the seasonal change from winter to spring weather.

Then the hams are hung, one by one, in a secadero, or drying hall, situated high in the eaves of the processing plants. Slatted shutters keep out the sun and let in air. Hams hang there throughout the summer, “sweating” during hot weather as the unsaturated fat liquefies slightly, bathing the meat in the nutty flavor derived from the acorn diet. Enzymes begin the process of turning meat into cured ham.

At the end of the summer the hams are transferred to the bodega, a dim cellar with thick walls where humidity encourages the growth of flor, a mold that contributes to the curing process. Like fine wine and cheese, hams mature and develop flavor and complex bouquet during this aging process that lasts 12 months or more. The whole process takes 21/2 to three years. During that time, the leg of pork loses almost a third of its weight.

In Spain, ibérico ham is served on its own, the better to appreciate its aroma, flavor and texture. Plain bread or toast with olive oil may accompany the ham, which is cut in translucently thin slices. Each slice has a rim of fat and is streaked with fat. The flesh is rosy-red, the fat creamy white.

There’s a reason for slicing it thinly, says Miguel Ullibarri, former director of Real Ibérico, a consortium of ibérico ham producers, and now a director of A Taste of Spain, a tour company specializing in food and wine tours. “If you put a thick piece in your mouth, the instinct is to immediately start chewing. You should pick up the ham with your fingers to warm it slightly, then allow the ham to temper on the tongue. The fat begins to melt, liberating the aroma and flavor.”

Once warmed on the tongue and gently chewed, the ham nearly melts, flooding the mouth and nose with flavor. It is the most umami of foods. It has “mouth-feel,” succulence, aroma and flavor on the tongue, plus that special quality that comes as taste and aroma mingle. It is sweet, nutty, subtly earthy. Amazingly, unsalty.

Maybe even better than the best ham in the world.

KNOW YOUR HAM:

Jamón Serrano. Cured ham made anywhere in Spain from cross-breed pigs, such as Duroc, Large White.

Jamón Ibérico. Cured ham made from ibérico breed pigs raised in the dehesa forests in southwestern Andalusia, Extremadura and western Castille.

Ibérico or Ibérico de Recebo. Designates ham from ibérico pigs finished on pig feed and grain, not acorns.

Ibérico de Bellota. Designates ham from ibérico pigs fattened on acorns.

Ibérico de Jabugo. Acorn-fed ibérico pigs from the town of Jabugo.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

http://daq.state.nc.us

RALEIGH – State environmental officials today ordered a Beaufort County hog farm to prepare a detailed odor management plan, in the first regulatory action taken under North Carolina’s new rules for controlling odors from animal operations.

The N.C. Division of Air Quality (DAQ) notified Vanguard Farms that it must prepare a “best management plan” for controlling objectionable odors at its hog operation near Chocowinity, about 10 miles south of Washington, N.C. A best management plan, or BMP, is a detailed description of measures for controlling odors.

“Hopefully, this management plan will help Vanguard Farms identify ways to correct its odor problems,” said Keith Overcash, DAQ deputy director. “We are optimistic that the farm can carry out low-cost measures to address these odor problems.”

Under the state odor rules, requiring a BMP is the first regulatory action the DAQ can take after determining that a facility has caused objectionable odors. If the odor problems persist, the DAQ eventually could require the farm to install control equipment, such as lagoon covers or “wash walls” that filter odors from barn ventilation systems.

The DAQ took action in the Vanguard case based on observations by air quality inspectors after receiving numerous complaints from nearby residents. Under the action, Vanguard must submit a BMP to the state within 90 days, and the DAQ has 90 more days to approve the plan. After approval, the farm would have 30 days to come into compliance with the plan. The DAQ can fine facilities up to $10,000 per violation for failing to comply with the rules.

The N.C. Environmental Management Commission (EMC) adopted temporary odor rules in 1999 under a directive from the General Assembly, with permanent rules scheduled to take effect on July 1, 2000. The rules apply to animal operations using liquid waste-treatment systems, such as lagoons and sprayfields. Regulated facilities must contain at least 250 hogs, 100 cattle, 75 horses, 1,000 sheep, or 30,000 chickens or turkeys.

DAQ enforces the rules, which aim to reduce objectionable odors beyond the boundaries of animal operations, phased-in by increasing levels of control. As a first step, all animal operations that meet the size thresholds and use liquid waste systems must comply with a list of required management practices. For example, farms should not operate sprayfields when winds could cause wastewater to drift onto neighboring properties.

As a second step, the DAQ requires farms to prepare best management plans at all new or modified animal operations and existing facilities that the division determines are causing objectionable odors. If objectionable odors persist, the DAQ can require facilities to submit modified plans and install odor-control equipment, such as lagoon covers or air filtration systems for barns.

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.