Archive for August 2010

Fairmont, MN – August 15, 2005. Avery Weigh-Tronix, LLC has introduced the Chute Weigh livestock weighing system designed to add weighing capabilities to livestock squeeze chutes and pens. The system offers fast portable or permanent installation under chutes and rapid setup to providing accurate weighing capabilities up to 10,000 lb. gross.

“The Chute Weigh system is an affordable and convenient method to add livestock weighing capabilities wherever you need them,” says Bob Seidel, Avery Weigh-Tronix, Director of Sales. “We’ve applied our Weigh Bar® design to deliver an economical system for livestock management that is compact, durable and very easy to install and operate.”

Based on Avery Weigh-Tronix rugged and precise Weigh Bar technology, each system includes two 3.5″ low profile weigh bars featuring super heavy-duty steel construction. Mounting is easy under manual or hydraulic squeeze chutes and livestock pens, and takes just minutes to install and setup. Twenty-foot polyurethane Weigh Bar cables offer remote connection to a choice of optional indicators. The 615 and 615/XL indicators provide simple, accurate and reliable livestock weighing, while the model M915A indicator offers advanced features including auto-LOC capabilities, statistical functions, 1,000 weighment memory and auto weight recording. All indicator models are compatible with a number of herd management EID software packages.

Each Weigh Bar has a 5,000 lb gross weighing capacity with dependable weatherproof construction. An aerospace-developed sealing agent protects against moisture in the toughest livestock weighing environments. Power options include 12 VDC external battery and a 115 VAC wall mounted transformer.

More information on the Chute Weigh system is available online at the Avery Weigh-Tronix web site, www.agscales.com, or call 800-368-1084.

Avery Weigh-Tronix is a pioneer in the design and manufacture of agricultural precision electronic weighing devices and control systems. For further information, contact: Avery Weigh-Tronix, Inc., 1000 Armstrong Drive, Fairmont, MN 56031. Phone: 507-238-4461. Fax: 507-238-8258. Email: ag@awtxglobal.com Website: www.agscales.com

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

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To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

Fairmont, MN – August 22, 2006. Avery Weigh-Tronix, Inc. has introduced its 640 Series family of indicators for agribusiness weighing applications. The 640 Series includes three easily programmable high performance models – the 640 for a wide variety of general applications, the 640XL with the industry’s largest 2″ display and the miniature 640M that is 72% smaller and ideal for places where space is limited such as in a truck or tractor cab. 640 Series indicators come with a 3-year factory warranty and pricing starts at $675.

The 640 Series offers the indication of gross and net weights along with a tare function that allows for the temporary zeroing of a scale – all at the push of a button. The 640 Series also offers one of the largest backlit LCD displays available (1.1″ for the 640 and 640M and 2″ for the 640XL). The bright green-yellow display features 10 adjustable brightness levels for optimal viewing in environments with poor visibility or from extended distances.

Data is stored in over 100 memory accumulation channels that can be set to display in alpha or numeric symbols and for manual or automatic accumulation. According to Avery Weigh-Tronix Product Manager Dave Swanson, “This is especially useful in identifying and sorting fields, seed type, groups of livestock, or amounts of recipes batched and fed for large-scale farming operations.” Swanson added, “The extensive offering of accumulation channels on the 640 Series is exactly what today’s progressive farmer needs to increase data recording efficiency for any operation.”

Collecting data reports is also made easy. Standard G/T/N printouts are available for transfer to a computer, printer or transfer data system with the optional RS-232 bi-directional serial port. Additional reports list the total accumulation, count and average of each channel for easy analysis of data needed for the following applications:

Applications. The 640 Series indicators are a flexible and ideal solution for integration with a wide variety of agribusiness weighing equipment, including:

Total Mix Ration (TMR) mixers
Livestock scales
Grain carts
Platform and truck scales
Weigh carts or seed tenders
Features. Many built-in features make the 640 indicators particularly easy to install and use.

Features a robust, seamless polycarbonate enclosure with a sealed back panel that resists moisture and dust
Hold mode maintains a constant weight when moving mobile equipment or when the scale is turned off
Motion filtering device settles down the weight display, ideal for mixers and livestock applications
Auto-LOC function locks and holds livestock weights on the display regardless of excess movement or vibration
Power recovery system secures all recorded statistics and automatically turns the indicator back on once power is restored
Operates reliably from -20° to 140° F (-20° to 60° C) Options.

The 640 and 640XL plug directly into weigh bars or load cells without the use of a junction box. Users looking for a completely wireless solution may include the RF option with their Avery Weigh-Tronix 640, 640XL or 640M indicator. The RF option provides full remote control – convenient for all weather conditions – that can be installed, for example, inside a front end loader or in a feed room.

Pricing starts at $675 for the 640M, $795 for the 640 and $990 for the 640XL.

For the nearest Avery Weigh-Tronix equipment supplier, please call 877-888-1646. More information on the 640 Series indicators is available on the company’s website at www.agscales.com.

Avery Weigh-Tronix is a pioneer in the agricultural design and manufacture of innovative precision electronic weighing devices and control systems. For further information, contact: Avery Weigh-Tronix, LLC., 1000 Armstrong Drive, Fairmont, MN 56031. Phone: 507-238-4461. Fax: 507-238-8258. email: ag@awtxglobal.com. Web: www.agscales.com

To get more information on a cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle guards informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on cattle guards, cattle scale, cattle guard, or pig feeder, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

For Immediate Release:

The Cloud Foundation Expands Lawsuit to Protect “Cloud’s” Wild Horse Herd
Foundation includes Forest Service in lawsuit

Washington, D.C. (July 23, 2010)—On July 21 the Cloud Foundation, Front Range Equine Rescue and author/advocate Carol Walker filed an amended complaint in Federal District Court to add the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) to their current suit against the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The suit challenges both agencies’ rejection of a Natural Management Approach for the herd and the planned construction of a two-mile long fence which would cut off the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Herd from crucial summer and fall grazing lands they’ve used for centuries. This small herd is the world’s most famous and the last remaining in Montana, sometimes called “Cloud’s herd” for the now-15-year old band stallion who TCF Director and plaintiff Ginger Kathrens has documented for the popular PBS Nature series. The herd traces its history back to the horses of the Spanish Conquistadors, the Lewis and Clark expedition horses, and Crow Indian War ponies. Plaintiffs contend that the USFS and BLM are engaging in illegal treatment of these federally-protected mustangs and that the Pryor Wild Horses are entitled to use lands in the Custer National Forest, currently not included in the designated range.

Plaintiffs in the litigation include Front Range Equine Rescue based in Larkspur, CO; Carol Walker, equine photographer and author of “Wild Hoofbeats: America’s Vanishing Wild Horses”; and Ginger Kathrens, Director of the Cloud Foundation and Emmy-Award winning producer with 16 years experience documenting and observing the Pryor Mountain herd.

“People value the whole spectacular Pryor ecosystem including this unique Spanish wild horse herd. Seeing the area fragmented by new fencing across pristine, wide-open meadows degrades the experience of visiting this area with true wilderness values,” states Kathrens. “Beyond the visual and environmental damage, it will compromise the future of Cloud’s globally-beloved herd. Forest Service should be working to set this area aside as a designated wilderness rather than working on how to build a bigger, stronger barrier to keep the Pryor horses from their rightful and essential high mountain meadows.”

Building the fence, cattle guard and gates would illegally confine horses to jurisdictional boundaries, restricting their natural and long-held seasonal pattern of use on East Pryor Mountain. Centuries old horse trails go straight through the line now flagged for construction of the fence, estimated to cost taxpayers between $25,000 and $100,000, not including USFS planning costs which, according to USFS, greatly exceed the cost of building the fence.

“The Forest Service has fought efforts to expand the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range to allow the herd to engage in their historical and seasonal migrations. Confining wild horse herds to smaller and smaller areas of the public lands lays the groundwork for more intrusive management and manipulation as the Forest Service and BLM contend that these animals will need to be removed from the wild for their own good,” states lead attorney, Valerie Stanley.

For a four-year period in the early 2000s the Pryor Herd was at zero population growth due to mountain lion predation on the foals, as well as the ever-present harsh winter weather and deadly lightning storms. The population of the herd increased only after BLM encouraged the killing of mountain lions. “The public has overwhelmingly supported allowing the herd the opportunity to manage itself. Apparently, BLM and the Forest Service think Mother Nature can’t get along without them,” Stanley concludes.

Over 100 wild horses have been using the Custer National Forest this month, which constitutes the majority of the Pryor Mountain wild horses, of which less than 150 adults remain in the wild following a massive roundup in September 2009. The Custer National Forest has not explained how the wild horses would be driven them back into the designated horse range. At least two new foals were born last week on the mountaintop and more births are anticipated. Running these young mustangs is dangerous and inhumane and can be fatal as has been proven during recent BLM roundups in Nevada and Oregon.

The area immediately adjacent to the designated range is not currently allocated for livestock grazing, but the Cloud Foundation questions USFS motives in blocking horses from this public land. Actions by the USFS are based, not on damage by the horses to the ecosystem, but seemingly on complaints from livestock permittees. Plaintiffs wonder if USFS is arranging for the building of this fence to facilitate cattle grazing on what would be a new livestock allotment on scenic subalpine meadows used annually by wild horses, mule deer, black bears and an array of small animals in the summer and fall.

“Wild horses have used these Forest Service lands for centuries. BLM and Forest Service have so far failed to work together to expand the range, using natural boundaries which encompass the mustangs’ use area, for the good of the herd and the public that loves them,” explains Front Range Equine Rescue President/Founder, Hilary Wood.

Historically, BLM directed livestock permittees on public grazing land to round up wild horses by aircraft. Once captured, the wild horses were either killed and butchered on the range or were shipped live to meat packing plants. In 1968, a public outcry was launched, spurred by local residents and ABC reporter, author and TCF Honorary Board Member, Hope Ryden. Ryden’s discovery of plans to trap and remove the Pryor Horses despite BLM assertions to the contrary caused a national outcry. In response, then Secretary of the Interior Stuart Udall issued an Executive Order creating the first public range ever dedicated in the United States for the protection of wild horses. The 39,000-acre range was intended to protect the horses, other wildlife, and the natural state of the area. At the time, none of the Custer National Forest Service lands were included, as that was outside of Interior Secretary Udall’s jurisdiction.

“Wild horses need to be treated like wild horses—not livestock. Right now the public can easily access the Forest Service lands and experience a wildlife display unlike any other,” states plaintiff Carol Walker. “We want the Forest Service to immediately abandon plans to build the fence.”

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To get more information on cattle scales and livestock scales, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

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Tuesday, Feb 23 2010, 5:21 pm
By Thomas Garcia: Quay County Sun

A lawsuit against Quay County over cattle guards was dismissed Thursday in 10th Judicial District Court, according to court reports.

“In my opinion, this is a frivolous lawsuit that is costing the county tax payers,” said Quay County Commission Chairman Franklin McCasland on Monday.

McCasland said the case brought against Quay County by Lee and Dusty Stone revolves around the removal of seven cattle guards.

“The county has paid $40,770 in legal fees through risk management for this case,” McCasland said. “The Stones are representing themselves and do not have to pay attorney fees.”

Recently Lee and Dusty Stone blamed the cattle guard for an injury to a horse they said had to be destroyed Feb. 4.

Dusty Stone said the horse tried to jump the cattle guard and got its front leg stuck between bars, breaking the animal’s leg. He said the horse had been promised to his daughter Mekenna Stone.

Attempts to reach the Stones for comment were not successful.

“I am sorry that the horse had to be put down,” McCasland said. “But that cattle guard did what is was meant to do.”

McCasland said he does not mean to sound harsh or cold hearted. He said the guards are used on federal and state land and all 33 counties in New Mexico to control livestock.

“If that cattle guard had not been there then the horse could have gone east to 469 or south to I-40,” McCasland said. “We could have been burying a family rather then putting a horse down.”

McCasland said last year a teenage boy was killed in Luna County when he hit a horse on a county road.

New Mexico State Police confirmed that Sept. 1, 2009, they responded to a single vehicle crash on the northbound lane of Over Hill Road in Luna County. Police said Ramon A. Pena, 18, of Deming was driving a 1995 Chevy S-10 pick-up, struck a horse losing control and rolling the vehicle several times. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police said the horse also died because of the impact.

In October 2009 the same case filed by Dusty Stone was dismissed by State District Judge Abigail Aragon.

“This is a matter that the county would like to put behind them and move forward,” said Richard Primrose, Quay County Manager.

Primrose said the commission has made every effort to accommodate Lee and Dusty Stone.

“Swinging metal gates were installed and one of the cattle guards can be taken apart so they can move their heavy equipment through,” McCasland said.

McCasland said the dispute began when Robin Smith asked the commission to install a cattle guard on his property which borders Lee’s.

“Robin provided the cattle guard and wanted it installed,” McCasland said. “He owns the property on both sides of the road. It gave his livestock access to both sides of the road.”

McCasland said the other cattle guards had been installed before he was on the commission.

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To get more information on feed bin and bulk feed bin, please visit our bulk feed bins informational site.

To get more information on cattle scales and livestock scales, please visit our cattle gestation chart informational site.

To get more information on cattle scale and livestock scale, please visit our cattle scales informational site.

To get more information on feed bins and bulk feed bins, please visit our grain weight conversion informational site.

To get more information on hay feeder, horse hay feeder and round bale feeder and, please visit our hay feeders informational site.

To get more information on hog equipment, hog feeder, outdoor hog feeders, and pig feeders, please visit our hog feeders informational site.

To get more information on livestock scale and cattle scales, please visit our livestock scales informational site.

“Five of those cattle guards have been for 40-to-50 years,” McCasland said.